Previous Exhibitions

Gus Fisher Gallery

2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

2017

New Acquisitions

10 January - 11 February 2017 

Naoka Tosa Projections

11 February 2017

Naoka Tosa is a Japanese digital artist whose work reflects a strong interest in Japanese traditions and cultures via digital technology. On 14 February 2017 Naoka presented a one-night only performance installation entitled Naoka Tosa Projections. Naoka visited Auckland as an official cultural envoy for the Japan Cultural Agency, and her work has been collected by the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the National Art Museum, Osaka. 

Without Words: Thomas Newman Pound Without Words: Thomas Newman Pound

Without Words: Thomas Newman Pound​

8 March - 22 April 2017

Thomas Newman Pound’s exhibition is a treasury of curious industrial flotsam and jetsam, gathered by the artist during five years of walks through Auckland’s industrial areas, demolition sites, railway lines and suburban streets. After bringing home his catch, Thomas would consider which objects began, when ‘laid out together,’ to ‘speak with one another.’ They did so ‘without words,’ of course, but would start to pair up in curious ways.

Inked on Paper: drawings by Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell Inked on Paper: drawings by Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell

Inked on Paper: drawings by Guardian cartoonist Steve Bell

8 March - 22 April 2017

Steve Bell is principal cartoonist for The Guardian. A scourge of the political establishment, he is master of political caricature in the tradition of Hogarth and Gillray, creating images that are funny and ferociously satirical. Bell visited Auckland in February and March 2017 as the University of Auckland Hood Fellow. He is a graduate in Fine Arts and Film from the University of Leeds; he first established a reputation with the cartoon strip 'Maggie's Farm' – a ferocious serial attack on the government of Margaret Thatcher – which appeared in London's Time Out from 1979. Two years later he began another (still running) satirical strip, 'If', for The Guardian newspaper.

Douglas MacDiarmid: Works from the Collection Douglas MacDiarmid: Works from the Collection

Douglas MacDiarmid: Works from the Collection

8 March – 22 April 2017

Ruth Watson: Geophagy Ruth Watson: Geophagy

Ruth Watson: Geophagy

28 April - 27 May 2017

Ruth Watson’s Geophagy is a project concerned with place, politics and subjectivity. Geophagy means ‘to eat dirt’ and here it is used as a metaphor for human activity and consumption, in particular relating to issues of overpopulation and white privilege.

The exhibition spans all Gus Fisher Gallery spaces. It comprises three new bodies of new work for the artist, plus one extant work made while on the Fulbright-Wallace Arts Trust Award residency at the Headlands Centre for the Arts outside San Francisco.

Flash Back: New Zealand Fashion Photographers 1930-2015

2 - 30 June 2017

Dramatically lit studio shots, quirky street photography, glamourous models in exotic locations, images that embrace the landscape as a player in the narrative, artifice and hyper-reality - the images of New Zealand fashion have evolved and changed over time. Flash Back: Fashion Photography in New Zealand 1930-2015, a new exhibition curated by the New Zealand Fashion Museum, brings together the work of local photographers who have captured the essence of their time and place and made a significant contribution to the development and articulation of our unique New Zealand identity through their work.

Hosted by the Gus Fisher Gallery as part of the Auckland Festival of Photography, the audience is invited to step into and experience being immersed in a fashion magazine. Several hundred fashion images by photographers including Monty Adams, Kerry Brown, Gordon Burt, Adam Custins, Marissa Findlay, Clifton Firth, Phil Fogle, Derek Henderson, Karen Inderbitzen-Waller and Delphine Avril Planqueel, Aaron K, James Lowe, Craig Owen, Euan Sarginson, Chris Sisarich, Max Thomson, Stephen Tilley and Des Williams have been brought together to illustrate the evolution of our fashion identity.

Curated by the New Zealand Fashion Museum.

Flash Back: New Zealand Fashion Photographers 1930-2015 Flash Back: New Zealand Fashion Photographers 1930-2015
Real Pictures: Imaging XX Real Pictures: Imaging XX

Real Pictures: Imaging XX

2 - 30 June 2017

Real Pictures: Imaging XX showcases a selection of historic work by women photographers whose careers were impacted by their involvement with Real Pictures. Real Pictures was a seminal, independent artist-run Auckland gallery and colour laboratory for New Zealand’s photographic community.

From 1979–1990 Real Pictures exhibited leading photographers, provided support for fledgling practitioners, and was a central community space for those invested in photographic art. For those represented in this Imaging XX exhibition, the gallery, lab, and associated community played a transformative role in their practice.

Curated by Nina Seja and featuring work by Sue Gee, Megan Jenkinson, Marie Shannon, Deborah Smith, and Jenny Tomlin.

WITNESS

14 - 29 July 2017

WITNESS is designed as a self-simulated avatar, modelled on the artist. This character, which is a biomimetic autonomous animation, invites the participant to entangle, in the moment, in liveliness and embodied sensibility. WITNESS is interested in exposing and exploring the volatile relations between technology, biological matter, artificial and human intelligence that are meshing in unprecedented ways.

This exhibition is the final outcome of a joint creative practice doctoral programme between University of Auckland and University of New South Wales. Curated by Deborah Lawler-Dormer, WITNESS has been developed in association with Associate Professor Mark Sagar, Oleg Efimov and Werner Ollewagen at the Laboratory for Animate Technologies, School of Bioengineering, University of Auckland. The soundtrack, as part of the live generated composition designed by Vincent Beatty, contains sonified ECG and galvanic skin response readings from neurophysiological and neuropsychological research of the artist intra-acting with the avatar. The nuerophsychological research session, interested in emotion and empathy with digital avatars, was led by Associate Professor Paul Corballis at the School of Psychology, University of Auckland.

WITNESS is the next iteration of LEAH from ALTER: Between Human and non-human, held at the Gus Fisher Gallery in April and May 2016.

WITNESS WITNESS

Roger Mortimer: Dilemma Hill

14 July - 2 September 2017

Roger Mortimer has been described as 'a contemporary visual mythologist'. His paintings portray beauty and barbarity, warning of the eternal perils of the human condition and expressing the hope of overcoming them.

The exhibition Roger Mortimer: Dilemma Hill surveys the last 16 years of Mortimer’s art practice; from the elaborate calligraphy of quirky early works based on bills, bureaucratic documents and mail order catalogues, to his recent exploration of imagery drawn from illustrated manuscripts of Dante’s 14th century epic poem, the Divine Comedy.

Mortimer’s menacing yet delicately coloured depictions invite both psychological and political readings and remind us of the human capacity for both evil and redemption. Graphic imagery lifted from medieval manuscripts set on New Zealand marine charts powerfully reflects contemporary global turmoil.

A joint project between Pataka Art + Museum and Gus Fisher Gallery, University of Auckland, Roger Mortimer: Dilemma Hill will be Mortimer’s first major solo exhibition in a public institution.​

Roger Mortimer: Dilemma Hill Roger Mortimer: Dilemma Hill
Marabar Caves Marabar Caves

Marabar Caves

4 August – 2 September 2017

Marabar Caves is an exhibition that takes its title from the caves featured in E.M. Forster’s 1924 novel 'A Passage to India.' This is the first exhibition in a series of three, entitled ‘Resources of the Social Imagination’ which looks at the relationship between narrative pleasure and contemporary art.

The exhibition takes as a point of departure Forster’s description of the caves in Chandrapore which are part actual and part fictive. Narratives that are cosmological, geological and mythical combine to describe a space that is highly sculptural, one that becomes psycho-sexual with the aid of a colonial gaze.

Audio, ceramics, embroidery and exhibition design form a response to Forster's description of the caves. A narrative written and led by Evangeline Riddiford Graham is accompanied by a series of ceramic works by Tom Hinton. Recently Areez Katki has been investigating non-linguistic narratives using synaesthesia and applied arts textile practice. Devices designed to lean against and languish on have been constructed and embroidered upon for the exhibition.

Organised by Victoria Wynne-Jones. 

The Auckland School The Auckland School

The Auckland School: Celebrating the Centenary of the University of Auckland School of Architecture and Planning

8 September - 4 November

Celebrating the long and rich history of teaching architecture at the University of Auckland, this centenary exhibition surveys the many lines of thought about architecture and related arts which have developed there from 1917 to the present day. With works from archives and private collections, sketches, watercolours, maps, paintings, digital presentations, as well as the expected orthographic projections and models by students and staff, the exhibition explores the sources and outcomes of teaching, and it frames the school as the site of research, speculation and radical aesthetics. 

Curated by the University of Auckland School of Architecture.

Tastes like honey Tastes like honey

Tastes like honey

8 September - 4 November

How do viewers deal with a two-dimensional picture space to make sense of its language and rhythm, or imagine the artist’s intent? How are New Zealand artists dealing with perspective while concurrently braving the abstract? These are just some of the questions being tackled by contemporary artists Cat Fooks, Grace Wright and Diane Scott. Through their diverse approaches to structuring paint on the flat picture plane, they can be linked together in their ability to break through surface tension.

Like artisan honey, the work in this show has been carefully crafted out of competing flavours: fruity, fresh and sweet, or earthy, nutty and a little bitter. Oftentimes, paint seems to have oozed onto the canvas, flowing and wrapping around itself. Sometimes forms are clearly defined; each line, dot and squiggle immediately visible to the viewer, and elsewhere shapes are cloudy or dark and opaque. Marrying these components into one exhibition, Tastes like honey celebrates and explores the sensuous possibilities of luscious paint on pictorial surface.

Curated by Jessica Douglas.

MODOS MODOS

MODOS

10 - 12 November

MODOS Architecture Design Thesis Show is an exhibition of design projects and theses extracts by Master of Architecture (Professional) graduating students from the University of Auckland's School of Architecture and Planning.
   
This exhibition is a rare opportunity to experience our students' explorations into a wide range of social, political and design issues within the built environment.

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2016

New Acquisitions

8 January – 5 February 2016

East/West: paintings by Reagan Lee East/West: paintings by Reagan Lee

East/West: paintings by Reagan Lee

9 February – 7 March 2016

Coinciding with the Chinese New Year on Monday 8 February, this exhibition consisted of over 20 scroll paintings of figurative subjects, painted with gestural energy and vibrant colour in a manner which reinforced their humanity. Although this style of painting has its origins in the Western painting tradition of Expressionism which often wrangles with the idea of God, the spiritual basis of the work acknowledged the Eastern religions dominated by Buddhism. In Reagan Lee’s work, East and West come together in a recombinant synthesis of great power and individuality.

The exhibition was supported by the Public Art Foundation.

Korero Tuku Iho: A Traditional Narrative, Alexis Neal Korero Tuku Iho: A Traditional Narrative, Alexis Neal

Korero Tuku Iho: A Traditional Narrative, Alexis Neal

11 March – 9 April 2016

A Traditional Narrative showcased tukutuku panels produced in 1954 by the Adult Education department of Auckland University College; the panels were aimed at keeping the traditions alive. Suspended from the ceiling through the middle of the gallery was a corresponding number of Alexis Neal’s own printed woven whāriki. Contrary to traditional placement of mats on the floor these whāriki were displayed in a way that allowed the viewer to study the printed and woven qualities and patterns on both sides.

Kofukofu Koloa: Dagmar Dyck Kofukofu Koloa: Dagmar Dyck

Kofukofu Koloa: Dagmar Dyck

11 March – 9 April 2016

In this installation a bed stacked with koloa was the central focus, paying homage to how Tongans value their pieces of koloa (fibre arts produced predominantly by women). These objects include ngatu, fala, kiekie and kato alu. Print holds an essential place in Dyck’s art practice; the koloa were accompanied by wall sized printed ngatu installation on paper, a hand woven paper ta'ovala, a hand woven paper fala, and paper kiekie strips, all made from hand printed woodcuts, relief prints and screenprints on paper.

ALTER: Between Human and Non-human ALTER: Between Human and Non-human

ALTER: Between Human and Non-human

22 April – 22 May 2016

ALTER was a group exhibition that provoked questions about our entangled relations between human and non-human, virtual and real selves. The artists featured in ALTER called into question our contemporary experience of human embodiment, which entails a fragmentation as well as a mediation that radically opens up new imaginings and readings of both the body and self-identity.

Curated by Deborah Lawler-Dormer.

Celebrating Wood: back to the future, Aberhart Celebrating Wood: back to the future, Aberhart

Celebrating Wood: back to the future, Aberhart

27 May – 2 July 2016

Post-war New Zealand was a fast-changing and industrious place. The growing human population demanded wood to build places like Laurence Aberhart’s ‘wooden wonderland’ in Nelson as well as farm fences, woolsheds and country homesteads. This high demand for timber was met by logging operations in native forests across the country. Kauri, totara and rimu were key targets because of their strong and versatile timber but many different species were cleared for timber and to provide access to the inner forest depths. The logging industry thrived. Many communities were centred on logging and milling operations and multiple generations worked very hard to harvest the bush. 

Ferreting on Ponsonby Road: Sait Akkirman

27 May – 2 July 2016

Traces of Movements: Dance Photography by John Savage

27 May – 2 July 2016

Wang Dongling: Contemporary Calligraphy Wang Dongling: Contemporary Calligraphy

Wang Dongling: Contemporary Calligraphy

8 July – 6 August 2016

Wang Dongling is believed to be one of the living masters of traditional Chinese calligraphy. Collected by The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Dongling was recently included in an exhibition there as well as in a solo show at New York’s Chambers Fine Art gallery. Dongling’s contemporary calligraphic work mines the traditions of calligraphy of text with much of it being named after passages from classical Chinese poems and fables. Dongling also frees the marks from visual meaning, extracting its abstracted potential and aligning his practice with the experimental ink movement of the 1990s.

Kate Davis – Unswept Floor

12 August – 3 September 2016

Touring Exhibition from Dunedin Public Art Gallery. 

Antipodean Gothic Antipodean Gothic

Antipodean Gothic

9 September – 1 October 2016

Art pieces from Mark Webster's private collection, curated by director Linda Tyler’s Arthist734 students. 

Louise Menzies: Spiritual Midwifery Louise Menzies: Spiritual Midwifery

Louise Menzies: Spiritual Midwifery

9 September – 1 October 2016

Intellectual Fashion Show Intellectual Fashion Show

Intellectual Fashion Show

7 October – 5 November 2016

The Intellectual Fashion Show 2016 was an enterprise that gave voice to the magical power of clothing. It concerned itself with the complex language of our sartorial choices and their potential to communicate ideas visually, intellectually and emotionally. It acknowledged and made visible the inherent protective nature of clothing which offers a shell to encase our soft interiors and armour to shield us as we confront our demons. The show was a celebration of our personal and intimate relationship with what we wear and of the rich opportunities for individual expression that reside in our physical and our imaginative wardrobes. Unlike a magic trick where the magician redirects our attention away from what is really going on, this exhibition invited the audience to focus on the central role that clothing plays in all of our lives. 

Lacquer Lacquer

Lacquer 

7 October – 5 November 2016

Ottchil (옻칠) art master SungSoo Kim has dedicated his life to nurture a firm ground for Ottchil art, a unique Korean lacquer art practice. Lacquer has been used by skilled lacquer artists for thousands of years, predominantly in East Asia. Master Kim learned the Mother-of-Pearl lacquer ware finish and wood work process, and developed his own techniques with the unconventional use of materials. The beauty of form, colour and nature are blended with the special inlay technique on a variety of materials such as Mother-Of-Pearl, metal strip and eggshell to make the patterned shapes shine, and have long lasting detail. Master Kim and his Ottchil students Ottchil came from Korea to share the mesmerising beauty and techniques of Ottchil art with Aucklanders. 

Replicating Genius: Impressionism 1874 Replicating Genius: Impressionism 1874

Replicating Genius: Impressionism 1874

11 November – 16 December 2016

Works by New Zealand and overseas artists hung together in a recreation of the first Impressionist exhibition from 1874. Hand-painted replicas of some of the most famous Impressionist paintings by Degas, Monet and others were in the same room, inspired by their first showing together in Paris over 140 years ago. Although the originals are now spread around the world, in this exhibition viewers could come and experience one of the most famous exhibitions at Replicating Genius.

Curated by art history student, Nathaniel Dunn. 

Toby Raine: ManCrush Toby Raine: ManCrush

Toby Raine: ManCrush

11 November – 17 December 2016

PhD Doctoral Submission. 

Welcome to My World: The Art of Sam Taare

18 November – 17 December 2016

Curated by Martin D Page, in association with the Outsider Art Fair. 

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2015

Adopt an Artwork from the University of Auckland Art Collection

9 January – 23 January 2015

The Elam International Printmaking Workshop The Elam International Printmaking Workshop

The Elam International Printmaking Workshop

30 January – 28 February 2015

The art of printmaking has a long and venerable tradition, and has endured into the 21st century because it continues to enthral art lovers with its extraordinary and delicate range of effects. Printmaking is continuing to develop new forms in the digital age, using new materials, and is one of the fastest growing areas of the fine arts. Across the world, fine arts institutions are expanding their printmaking facilities and programmes. The Elam International Printmaking Workshop (EIPW 2015) brought together respected printmakers from around the globe to celebrate this unique art form. In conjunction with Elam students, staff and the wider arts community, they produced original new works across the full range of printmaking techniques, culminating in this major exhibition. 

Peter Madden: Coming from all the places you have never been Peter Madden: Coming from all the places you have never been

Peter Madden: Coming from all the places you have never been

8 – 30 May 2015

John Fields: Signature Series John Fields: Signature Series

John Fields: Signature Series

2 June – 2 July 2015

Signature series is a collection of images taken over a three-month period in 1975 by American-born photographer John Fields. Originally trained as a scientific photographer, Fields was employed at the University of Auckland Medical School where he was responsible for many innovations in forensic photography. Alongside his university work Fields documented the passage of New Zealand into a modern state by photographing motorways and heritage buildings. The works in this series are intimate portraits Fields made of the interiors of friends’ and colleagues’ houses.

Curated by David Langman and part of Auckland Festival of Photography. 

Fiona Amundsen: The Imperial Body Fiona Amundsen: The Imperial Body

Fiona Amundsen: The Imperial Body

2 June – 2 July 2015

“If I don’t come home, I’ll see you at Yasukuni”. Such was the phrase uttered by World War Two soldiers and pilots to their families as they went into battle. Established in 1869, Yasukuni shrine in Tokyo is dedicated to people who died whilst serving the Emperor and whose souls are thereby enshrined as deities. Family members visit to mourn their deceased loved ones and ultimately, be reminded about the atrocities of war. Fiona Amundsen’s visual project aimed to provoke new experiences of historicised narratives that both pay homage to trauma, but resist holding histories as static or fixed.

Part of Auckland Festival of Photography.

Gretchen Albrecht Gretchen Albrecht

Gretchen Albrecht

15 July – 11 September 2015

At Old Government House, curated by Alice Tyler.

From The Galleries: Eden Arts Awards From The Galleries: Eden Arts Awards

From The Galleries: Eden Arts Awards

21 July – 1 August 2015

A celebration of the best work from the country’s top four tertiary art schools were held in an exhibition together. The work of five students from each of Elam School of Fine Arts, Unitec, Whitecliffe and AUT were included.

Camouflage: Conceal/Distort/Deceive/Disguise Camouflage: Conceal/Distort/Deceive/Disguise

Camouflage: Conceal/Distort/Deceive/Disguise

7 August – 26 September 2015

This exhibition included 13 works by New Zealand artists from the late 20th and early 21st centuries that explore the theme of camouflage across contexts such as gender relations, ethnic identity, and the natural environment. These artists implement the techniques of blending, exposing and disrupting over a surprising array of media and formats. This exhibition was curated by the postgraduate students of ARTHIST 734 Art Writing and Curatorial Practice, a course that opens up professional opportunities for students interested in working with art galleries and museums.

No Free Man: To No One Deny Justice No Free Man: To No One Deny Justice

No Free Man: To No One Deny Justice

7 August – 26 September 2015

Teina Pora, Louise Nicholas and four prisoners featured in this dramatic photographic exhibition. Organised to mark the 800th anniversary of the signing of Magna Carta, photographer Nigel Swinn focussed on faces to tell the story of the legacy of this document in New Zealand law. Prominent law firm Buddle Findlay was the sponsor, and the curator was Dr Erin Griffey, an expert on portraiture and Head of Art History Department from the University of Auckland.

“Nigel Swinn has made stunning, hugely emotive larger than life photographic portraits that encourage us to engage with the humanity of the subjects,” Griffey comments.

Eyetrackers: Between Art and Neuroscience Eyetrackers: Between Art and Neuroscience

Eyetrackers: Between Art and Neuroscience

7 August – 26 September 2015

Eyetrackers was a highly innovative exhibition that explored the fascinating borderland lying between visual art and visual neuroscience. In this exhibition, a series of original artworks drawn from the University of Auckland collection were juxtaposed with state-of-the art (no pun intended) eye tracking technology. Video presentations recreated the shifting gaze patterns of individual viewers, as they engaged with works of art; and installations enabled visitors to interact directly with eye tracker technology, monitoring patterns of looking behaviour and changes in pupil size, as they inspected the different images included in the exhibition.

Curated by Tony Lambert (School of Psychology, University of Auckland) and Greg Minissale (Department of Art History, University of Auckland).

My Memorial: Black Wall and Oral Histories My Memorial: Black Wall and Oral Histories

My Memorial: Black Wall and Oral Histories

9 – 24 October 2015

My Memorial at Gus Fisher Gallery combined two aspects of Kathy Temin’s practice by staging one of her characteristic abstracted forests alongside her oral histories. By incorporating the sound work which details survivor testimonies captured at war memorial events, this project became a darkly poignant and timely memorial garden to WW1 survivors and their families. It was also a personal homage and goes some way to reclaim Temin’s father’s internment in Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

Vivid: A Paul Hartigan Retrospective Vivid: A Paul Hartigan Retrospective

Vivid: A Paul Hartigan Retrospective

30 October – 9 December 2015

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2014

A Continuous Line: The Art of Dennis K. Turner A Continuous Line: The Art of Dennis K. Turner

A Continuous Line: The Art of Dennis K. Turner

10 January – 1 March 2014

70 artworks by this renegade expatriate were presented together for the first time in a large-scale survey exhibition curated by the king of kiwiana, historian Richard Wolfe. Dennis K. Turner illustrated Barry Crump’s books, made murals for the trade unions, celebrated Māori and worked as a tour guide at Waitomo. Notoriously, he is the only New Zealand artist to have ever been arrested and convicted for painting on a Sunday. 

Out of the vault: works from the University of Auckland Art Collection

7 – 29 March 2014

In early December 1965, University funds were allotted for the purchase of artworks within the 1966 academic year. The collection was inaugurated by the acquisition of a painting and two drawings by Colin McCahon. Since then the collection has acquired some major works by significant New Zealand artists, including Gretchen Albrecht, Don Binney, Neil Dawson, Pat Hanly, Frances Hodgkins, Paul Hartigan, Ralph Hotere, Colin McCahon, Milan Mrkusich, Gordon Walters, John Weeks, Robin White and Toss Woollaston. Almost fifty years later, with the amalgamation of the College of Education collection, there are now around 1,500 works in the collection, displayed across the Grafton, Epsom, Tamaki and City campuses.

Scape: Deborah Crowe

7 – 29 March 2014

Scape, a series of digital collages, responded to built environments, twisting and distorting systems of construction. Fabricated scapes offered reimagined spaces where architectural frameworks and elements of the ‘natural’ world intersected and tangled. Composite multifaceted structures housed internal spaces, offering hypothetical places to explore, to navigate through and to get lost in. Fragments of organic and built worlds fused in environments denying their familiarity. A haptic sensibility was evident where surface and scale incited invitations for an imagined interaction or occupation by the viewer. 

Wasteland: masculinities in contemporary art

4 April – 3 May 2014

Curated by Tim Wagg.

Gabriel Lester: Cineast Gabriel Lester: Cineast

Gabriel Lester: Cineast

4 April – 3 May 2014

Elam International Artist-in-Resident.

Faint: Watercolours by Georgie Hill Faint: Watercolours by Georgie Hill

Faint: Watercolours by Georgie Hill

9 – 31 May 2014

Derived from the same French word that gives us the verb ‘to feign’, feints are manoeuvres designed to distract or mislead an opponent. In fencing, a feint attack (or retreat) gives the impression that you will move in a certain direction when you may not be going to move at all. In this suite of watercolours, Georgie Hill created a surface of disruptive patterns derived from camouflage to hide signature seating designed by modernists Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann, Le Corbusier and modern Irish architect and designer Eileen Gray. To complement the narrative of loss and appropriation of work by women which her choice of imagery implies, she mimics the protective colouration found in nature where over generations a moth, for example, adapts to blend in with its surroundings to avoid predation.

Exhibited in association with City Gallery Wellington. 

Therapies: New Photography by Christine Webster

9 May – 3 June 2014

Christine Webster’s photography gets under the skin with its unsettling beauty and unnerving, direct gaze at subjects usually left in the dark. For over 35 years, her work has examined the way in which the female body has been constructed historically. In Therapies, she re-imagined the age of the crone, barren in body and pushed to the outskirts of a society that worships youth and beauty. In these recent photographs made in England, she produced a sequence of images which evoke powerlessness, anguish and desolate beauty.

Exhibited in conjunction with Milford Galleries, Dunedin and the Auckland Festival of Photography.

Voicing the Visible: feminist art from the University collection Voicing the Visible: feminist art from the University collection

Voicing the Visible: feminist art from the University collection 

9 May – 3 June 2014

To celebrate the move of the Women’s Studies Association to Auckland, and the re-design of its website, 18 students from the postgraduate Art History programme in ARTHIST734 Art Writing and Curatorial Practice curated an exhibition of feminist art from the university’s collection.

Ane Tonga: Grills Ane Tonga: Grills

Ane Tonga: Grills

30 May – 28 June 2014

Grills are gold covers or caps on teeth that have a long history and are found in many societies and subcultures. In Tonga they are a fairly new and now popular form of cosmetic adornment. Immediately, Ane Tonga’s large, close-up photographs document this practice, which also connects with ideas about beauty, in particular the interface between Tongan and Euro-American conceptions of the beautiful. What we see, occupying most of the picture space, are the lower parts of women’s faces, focused principally on the gold teeth, mouth and lips. The Tongan term for gold teeth is nifo koula, and the gold often comes from second hand or family jewellery. Thus, for Tongan people, layers of genealogy and memory are embodied by these grills. 

Bent: Mary MacPherson

6 – 28 June 2014

History in the Taking: 40 Years of PhotoForum History in the Taking: 40 Years of PhotoForum

History in the Taking: 40 Years of PhotoForum

6 – 28 June 2014

PhotoForum is a living entity of networks, communities, and national and international connections. Founded by John B. Turner and a group of ‘committed photographers’, PhotoForum was incorporated as a Society on 12 December 12 1973, publishing the first Photo-Forum magazine in February 1974. PhotoForum has served as a promoter and champion of
New Zealand photography, has been an idea lab for photographic history and criticism, and has provided support to legions of photographers and writers. History in the Taking celebrates this diverse lineage with a sampling of work published and/or exhibited by PhotoForum and its precursors from 1970 to 2014, drawn from the PhotoForum archive, John B. Turner’s personal collection, artists, collectors, and the University of Auckland collection. It offers insights into the influence that PhotoForum has had on the photographic cultural landscape of New Zealand, alongside the parallel influence of John B. Turner in his role as Lecturer at the Elam School of Fine Arts from 1971 to 2011. 

Printmaking: Beyond the Frame Printmaking: Beyond the Frame

Printmaking: Beyond the Frame

4 July – 30 August 2014

Printmaking: Beyond the Frame was an exhibition of the work of members of the Central Print Council Aotearoa New Zealand (CPCANZ) and three invited guests – Kate Mclean, Alexis Neal and Jeff Thomson. The title refers to the frame that surrounds a two-dimensional work, isolating it from the wall and forming a barrier of protection or decoration. It also refers to the contemporary perception of print.

Dark Arts: 20 Years of the Holloway Press Dark Arts: 20 Years of the Holloway Press

Dark Arts: 20 Years of the Holloway Press

4 July – 30 August 2014

This retrospective celebrates the work of the Holloway Press, the fine press of the University of Auckland, which was established in 1994 by Alan Loney and Associate Professor Peter Simpson. The Press was named for Ron Holloway (1909-2003) of the Griffin Press, who gave the University the printing equipment that formed its basis.

Curated by Francis McWhannell.

The Kindest Cut: Figurative Prints by Sam Harrison

4 July – 30 August 2014

In association with Fox/Jensen Gallery.

Lost For Words: Mervyn Williams: From Modernism to the Digital Age Lost For Words: Mervyn Williams: From Modernism to the Digital Age

Lost For Words: Mervyn Williams: From Modernism to the Digital Age

5 September – 1 November 2014

This 50-year survey of the career of senior New Zealand artist, Mervyn Williams, who was born in 1940, was organised to coincide with the launch of the Ron Sang publication of the same name. Carefully curated by Ed Hanfling, the exhibition focused on three phases: the Op Art-inspired paintings of the 1960s and 1970s which earned the artist the epithet ‘Optic Merv’; the textured paint surfaces of the 1980s, known as ‘the crusties’ which create the illusion of light and shadow across the surface and which segued into relief works made of driftwood washed up the Whanganui River, and finally the monochromes of the 1990s where trompe l’oeil techniques combine with illusionistic abstraction.

GIFTED: Works donated to the University of Auckland Art Collection GIFTED: Works donated to the University of Auckland Art Collection

GIFTED: Works donated to the University of Auckland Art Collection

5 September – 1 November 2014

Curated by art history student Maria-Constanza Labra-Odde and sponsored by the University of Auckland Society.

Mudlark: Ceramics by Bronwynne Cornish Mudlark: Ceramics by Bronwynne Cornish

Mudlark: Ceramics by Bronwynne Cornish

8 November – 13 December 2014

New Graduate Works

5 – 20 December 2014

This exhibition profiled the work of 2014’s graduating students from Elam School of Fine Arts, awarding three artists whose works also become a part of the university's collection.

Curated by Rebecca Boswell.

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2013

Japan: Kingdom of Characters Japan: Kingdom of Characters

Japan: Kingdom of Characters

9 January – 1 February 2013

For someone with the most basic of features – and indeed, no mouth at all – Hello Kitty, the animated Japanese cat created by toy company Sanrio in 1974, is able to express any number of emotions as she adorns everything from children’s toys to household appliances. While the pink cat is the most recognisable outside Japan, she’s just one of thousands of characters that have permeated Japanese life since the end of World War II, from manga comics and books, television, movies and computer games to everyday products, street signs and even medical supplies. In recent years, a subculture related to Japanese anime and manga has rapidly attracted worldwide attention. To make the most of this trend, the Japan Foundation organised this traveling exhibition called Japan: Kingdom of Characters which examined characters as one radical aspect of this subculture.

Art of the Invisible: Exploring the world of nanotechnology Art of the Invisible: Exploring the world of nanotechnology

Art of the Invisible: Exploring the world of nanotechnology: An exhibition of extraordinary images from the MacDiarmid Institution collection 

8 – 23 February 2013

This exhibition presented images from the work of New Zealand graduate students who research in the field of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the science of manipulating matter at an atomic and molecular scale and has far-reaching applications. 

The Invisible World presented this incredible field of research in a new artistic context, and underlined the unexpected beauty found in these fascinating scientific images.

Stream of thoughts: new work by Renee Bevan

8 – 23 February 2013

New Work is Renee Bevan’s first significant solo exhibition and features both jewellery objects and photographic documentation of performance-based jewellery work.

These new works operated undercover, as a set of tools and cues ready to aid us in an exploration of the aspects of life that we often fail to notice: the unexpected love token, a set of eyes watching from behind a picture, the remnants of unspoken thoughts or the subverted reworking of a childhood game. These devices help to highlight or freeze-frame a moment in time. The new works suggest the wonder of discovery and an investigation of the minutiae of experiences we are surrounded by every day.

Art in the Service of Science: Dunedin’s John Buchanan (1819-1898) Art in the Service of Science: Dunedin’s John Buchanan (1819-1898)

Art in the Service of Science: Dunedin’s John Buchanan (1819-1898)

1 March – 27 April 2013

This exhibition aims to give a broader understanding of John Buchanan’s significance for both New Zealand’s science history and its art history in four main ways: first, by investigating how his training as a textile designer in Scotland led to his development as both a botanist and artist in New Zealand; second, by considering his relationship to the emergent techniques of photography and lithography as they were practised in New Zealand; third, by situating Buchanan in the traditions of European landscape and natural history illustration; and fourth, by assessing his contribution as a botanist against recent theorisation of colonial science as perennially in the service of Empire and economics. The catalogue essay maps his route from journeyman to gentleman, and illuminate the possibilities of art and science as technologies for self-fashioning in the colonial context.

More Than We Know: Performance  More Than We Know: Performance

More Than We Know: Performance  

1 March – 27 April 2013

More Than We know: Performance was a series of site-specific and site-based performances that explore how the physical features of the Kenneth Myers Centre, where Gus Fisher Gallery is housed, influenced social interaction, and by corollary the knowledge we have of the building. 

Girl, Empire Girl, Empire

Girl, Empire

3 – 18 May 2013

Girl, Empire presented a revisiting of the concept of ‘the Young-Girl’ from Tiqqun’s Preliminary Materials for a Theory of the Young-Girl first published in France in 1999.

For Tiqqun, the Young-Girl is the ideal subject of the consumer age. ‘She’ is the embodiment of late capitalism’s powers of seduction and conjoins two ideal states; youth and femininity. Residing perennially in the ‘now,’ the Young-Girl terrorises the present by commanding beauty and innocence. In all manifestations she is transparent, commodified, accessorised. By labouring over her body and disciplining her looks, she performs her own happiness as if it relies solely on positive experiences and appearances.

Curated by Rebecca Boswell.

Anri Sala: The Long Sorrow and Tlatelolco

10 May – 10 August 2013

This exhibition depicts the area of Tlatelolco in Mexico City, centred on a square surrounded by pre-Columbian archaeological sites with massed contact-period graves, a 17th century church built amidst the ruins, and Mexico’s largest apartment complex. The area became famous with a government massacre of student protestors 10 days before the 1968 Mexican Olympics. Developed as a utopian city within a city, Tlatelolco became depressed after the massacre and has increasingly suffered from crime and squatting, especially after damage from earthquakes in 1985 and 1993. None of this is explicit in Anri Sala’s video, which has no dialogue, but these unspoken stories are embedded as memories in the surroundings and are carried by the protagonists.

Sala’s Long Sorrow video demonstrates music’s communicative potential, dramatically showing musical improviser Jemeel Moondoc playing saxophone while suspended from the 18th floor apartment window of a Berlin housing estate. Moondoc expresses the difficult circumstances of his situation through his playing, which mingles with surrounding city sounds. For Sala’s performance work 3-2-1, Moondoc recorded a response to Long Sorrow, which was then accompanied in the gallery by a live saxophonist, who also duets with the video before playing solo. This intermingling of elements renews the work with each performance, linking past and present through a layering of performance and documentation as an ongoing dialogue of time and space.

Part of Auckland Triennial. 

Tahi Moore Tahi Moore

Tahi Moore

10 May – 10 August 2013

For the 5th Auckland Triennial, New Zealand artist Tahi Moore presented five videos as well as series of objects placed in a variety of unexpected locations in the foyer. A foyer is a generally a transitional space or passageway that typically poses an architectural challenge for artists. It took central importance to Moore’s work though, as the artist drew our attention between the changing historical functions of the Gus Fisher Gallery and the transitivity of its antichamber.

Part of Auckland Triennial.

Lights Moods South: Miki Nobu Komatsu

24 May – 29 June 2013

All of Miki Nobu Komatsu’s exhibited photographs are Cibachrome prints. They are direct prints from slides (transparency film), and do not go through any digital process. Cibachrome is considered to be the highest quality archival photographic material available. It has a rich lustrous finish, giving an almost iridescent 3D realism. Unlike other print material, the chemistry doesn’t make the colour. Azo dyes, which provide stable vivid colours, are imbedded into the paper at manufacture. The layers of cyan, magenta and yellow dye are so pure and intense that a black layer is unnecessary. After exposure and subsequent processing, any surplus colour is bleached away, leaving a pure dye image with no chemical residues.

Sholto Buck: Interlude Sholto Buck: Interlude

Sholto Buck: Interlude

24 May – 29 June 2013

These photographs explored the nature of transition and solitude: the in-between moments where we find ourselves alone, in a quiet moment of passing from one point to another; captured moments in which we are stripped bare of distractions and comforts, but which also provide a release and brief repose from ourselves, absorbed as we are in the transition. Commonplace symbols in dreamlike landscapes evoke a sense of dislocation. The spaces that serve as backdrops induce a feeling of reflective silence. Light and water shift and flow as elusive and fickle as dreams. 

Artwork: Peter Campbell Artwork: Peter Campbell

Artwork: Peter Campbell

6 July – 10 August 2013

When it comes to this exhibition, the paper Peter Campbell used is a good place to start: full cotton, cold-pressed loose leaf, 300 grams heavy, absorbent and fine fibred. It is watercolourists’ paper, paper for someone who pauses to enjoy it before the work even begins. There were piles of it in the front room of the Campbell’s London house: empty pages which give back the light generously when you open the drawers. There were piles of finished works too, some of them familiar from the covers of London Review of Books past.

Each fortnight from 1996 onwards, Wellington-born artist, designer and typographer Peter Campbell produced a cover image for the magazine. Typically watercolour, these images came to visually define the publication for many readers. Their subjects vary widely – hard to account for the same eye, hand, across a boldly stylised teapot reminiscent of Matisse, an interior with all the melancholic stillness of an Edward Hopper, and an almost photo-real image of birds’ eggs across a white ground – and yet there is something in the tone of all the works that makes them immediately recognisable.

Exhibited in conjunction with City Gallery, Wellington. 

A Different View: artists address pornography A Different View: artists address pornography

A Different View: artists address pornography

23 August – 12 October 2013

This exhibition was shown in conjunction with two researchers from the University of Auckland Psychology Department, Nicola Gavey and Virginia Braun. The subject of their research is the effect of mainstream pornography on society. Twenty artists have been invited to respond to this research in an attempt to develop public debate on the issues.

Marti Friedlander: Tokelau Marti Friedlander: Tokelau

Marti Friedlander: Tokelau

18 October – 14 December 2013

Saskia Leek: Desk Collection Saskia Leek: Desk Collection

Saskia Leek: Desk Collection

18 October – 14 December 2013

Desk Collection featured sixty works produced by Saskia Leek from 1994-2012, drawn from New Zealand and Australian public and private collections. The title of the show stakes a claim for art that is intimate, hinting at the modest scale of Leek’s paintings and the fact that almost every one of them could have been produced at a desk. The exhibition traces Leek’s rise to prominence in 1995 with the exhibition Hangover which placed her in a new generation of artists whose work explored popular culture. Evolving from the personal, comic book nature of the early works, she moved on to test the possibilities and limits of the painted image. Curator Emma Bugden said, “At a time of ever larger and louder artworks, Dunedin-based artist Saskia Leek is known for the intimate quality of her paintings. There is a deep sense of familiarity in Leek’s pictures, connecting us to images we already know and presenting them anew; most of her works are created in response to existing artworks.”

Toured by the Dowse Art Museum.  

New Graduate Works New Graduate Works

New Graduate Works

6 – 21 December 2013

This exhibition profiled the work of 2013’s graduating students from Elam School of Fine Arts, awarding three artists whose work also became a part of the permanent university's collection.

Curated by Rebecca Boswell. 

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2012

Hutton and Cotton: The McGregor Museum Revisited: An installation by Christine Hellyar Hutton and Cotton: The McGregor Museum Revisited: An installation by Christine Hellyar

Hutton and Cotton: The McGregor Museum Revisited: An installation by Christine Hellyar

20 January – 3 March 2012

Hutton and Cotton was an installation by artist Christine Hellyar that investigates taxonomies and threatened species with references to The University of Auckland’s own museum history. Hellyar makes use of the chaos and order of the partly demolished McGregor Museum in the School of Biological Sciences.

Hellyar’s work considers the divisions of animal, vegetable and mineral, and combines the history of museums and the history of art. The names in the title refer to Hutton, the 19th century author of the first reference book on New Zealand native animals, and Cotton, the 20th century geomorphologist who had a great influence on painter Colin McCahon.

Reuben Paterson: Bottled Lighting Reuben Paterson: Bottled Lighting

Reuben Paterson: Bottled Lighting

20 January – 3 March 2012

Bottled Lightning highlighted Reuben Paterson’s lively exploration of materials, starting with his glitter-on-canvas depictions of kowhaiwhai and fabric designs, and diversifying into a range of media including sequins, foil, diamond dust, shoes, gourds, video and installation. Guiding this was Paterson’s ongoing conceptual investigation into aspects of time and energy through the properties of light, which reflected the power of history, memory, whakapapa, spirituality and place. His work is a celebration of the future, interwoven with a melancholic consideration of the present as it slips into the past – like the faded glory of a much-anticipated party, gleefully recalled the morning after.

Jill Kennedy: Eyes on the Moon Jill Kennedy: Eyes on the Moon

Jill Kennedy: Eyes on the Moon

9 March – 28 April 2012

Space exploration and flight took centre stage in Glasgow-born artist Jill Kennedy’s Eyes on the Moon, whether it was in the form of shuttle launches, satellite orbits, or soccer balls arcing through the air. In a similar manner to her earlier New Educational Series, this exhibition saw Kennedy playing with our expectations of ‘correct’ scale, highlighting the way the reduction or expansion of an object’s size can create a surreal, other-worldly experience. This sense of the bizarre and mysterious was extended as items of the everyday were transported into the impossibly exotic as beach and soccer balls bounced and flew through a star-studded stratosphere, and disembodied panda heads streaked through the sky.

John Edgar: Ballast, Bringing The Stones Home John Edgar: Ballast, Bringing The Stones Home

John Edgar: Ballast, Bringing The Stones Home

9 March – 28 April 2012

These sculptures by New Zealand artist John Edgar were inspired by the story of emigrants leaving their homeland, the voyage through unknown seas and the arrival in a new land.

Edgar connected with his Scottish roots during a visit in 2005. He collected stone from historic quarries in Scotland, and created these sculptures which reference the land, the flag and the compass.

Stone was traditionally used as ballast on boats, keeping them stable on a journey. Like the emigrants on board these boats, the stones left Scotland for New Zealand. Here they were altered, both physically and culturally, and returned to Edinburgh for exhibition at the National Museum of Scotland in 2009. The stones have since returned to New Zealand, completing the cycle.

Paper-jams: artists between the covers Paper-jams: artists between the covers

Paper-jams: artists between the covers

9 March – 28 April 2012

Acknowledging the substantial history of text in art, Paper-jams looked sideways from that legacy to foreground those artists who addressed the page itself as a compelling context, rather than focusing on the content of the words contained within. These works challenged the materiality of the page and the creative potential of its limitations to break through the conventional ways we absorb and present information. Influenced by the collages and cut-ups of cubism, dada, fluxus and pop, they explored paper as a rich surface to scrutinise or excavate.

Assume Nothing: six early career artists Assume Nothing: six early career artists

Assume Nothing: six early career artists

4 May – 23 June 2012

Peter Peryer: Other (portraits 1975-2011) Peter Peryer: Other (portraits 1975-2011)

Peter Peryer: Other (portraits 1975-2011)

4 May – 23 June 2012

This exhibition highlighted the intermittent periods of portrait photography that Peter Peryer has completed. Showcasing work from 1975 through to 2011, these portraits were collectively titled ‘Other’, in distinction from the ‘Erika’ suite and self-portraits. The exhibition illuminated Peryer’s approach to the human form, offering single portraits that were intricately planned and characterised by an enticing quality of mystery. While his later portraits are more tightly cropped and are often set against a blank backdrop, there remains a perceptible thread of stillness and mystery that runs through the entirety of his work.

Te Ata tu: the new light Te Ata tu: the new light

Te Ata tu: the new light

4 May – 23 June 2012

These works in the gallery foyer were selected from The University of Auckland Art Collection to reflect on cycles of renewal. The exhibition considered the flow of time from one day to the next – of farewells to the past and new beginnings. It acknowledged the patterns of the cosmos from which we track the seasons and measure the ebb and flow of life. 

Te Ata tu means ‘just before the dawn’. Usually in late May, this is when the Matariki constellation (also known at the Pleiades) rises from the same position as the sun to signal the winter solstice and the beginning of Aotearoa’s New Year. For Māori, this is a time to reflect on the past year, plan ahead, and welcome the new generation. From the darkness of one period closing, a new era dawns from seeds that grow amidst the wreckage of winter. It is a fitting sentiment for an exhibition bookended by The University of Auckland’s graduation week and the beginning of Matariki.

The artists (Bill Culbert, Hye Rim Lee, Lisa Reihana, Connie Samaras, Paul Tangata and John Weeks) are from around the Asia-Pacific region, spanning the dateline that places New Zealand perpetually in the future to the rest of the world.

Vincent Ward: Inhale, Cinematic Installations Vincent Ward: Inhale, Cinematic Installations

Vincent Ward: Inhale, Cinematic Installations

6 July – 25 August 2012

Inhale is one half of a pair of simultaneous exhibitions that explored themes of human vulnerability and transformation. The exhibitions drew together two strands of Vincent Ward’s career, as a leading figure in the feature film industry with a background in fine arts. While Inhale at the Gus Fisher Gallery features Ward’s cinematic installations, Exhale at The Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre showcased physically imposing photographic, print and painted works.

Douglas Wright: Body of Work Douglas Wright: Body of Work

Douglas Wright: Body of Work

31 August – 30 October 2012

Douglas Wright: Body of Work included selected photographs and films of Wright’s most seminal choreographies; Wright’s drawings, paintings and small installations; drafts of his poems, an audio recording of Wright reading from his memoir Ghost Dance, and his choreographic workbooks. This major retrospective celebrated Wright’s extraordinary creative output across his 30-year career, and it stimulated sustained discussion on Wright’s artistry and his artistic process. Supported by The University of Auckland University’s Dance Studies department, timed with Tempo, but positioned outside the theatre, the exhibition and accompanying public programme strengthen and extend dance audiences.

Curated by Georgina White.

Eddie Clemens: Ask the dust Eddie Clemens: Ask the dust

Eddie Clemens: Ask the dust

30 October – 15 December 2012

Eddie Clemens’ work uses technology and everyday objects to prompt us to reconsider our experience of places and things. With a nod to science fiction, in Ask the dust Clemens ruptured our expectations and memory of space to suggest alternative narratives. With the aid of embedded tracking mechanisms (3-axis gyros and accelerometers), his fibre optic ‘scrubbers’ (Formal Thought Disorder) store and relay data based on their previous use and movement. This relates not only to a mapping of a virtual scrubbing of the Gus Fisher Gallery floors where they resided, but also previous activations in other places, including University of Canterbury’s SoFA Gallery, and reference to the history of now-lost locations in Christchurch. Other works in the exhibition further explored the opening up of virtual spaces as we anticipated and simulated the possibilities of new developments, scrubbing away the past with high-tech fictions for the future.

Sarah Munro: Surface Detail Sarah Munro: Surface Detail

Sarah Munro: Surface Detail

30 October – 15 December 2012

Sarah Munro’s practice explores relationships between painting, representation and technology. Her paintings are developed directly from CAD (Computer Aided Design) drawings and produced with machine milling, fibreglass and automotive paint. The work plays off distinctions between ‘real’ and virtual. Fictitious shadows and highlights generated within the software are rendered across their three-dimensional fiberglass supports using an automotive paint system so that, when finished, they seem to represent their counterparts drawn within the digital environment.

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2011

Playing with Fire: A suite of three ceramic exhibitions to celebrate 50 years of Auckland studio potters Playing with Fire: A suite of three ceramic exhibitions to celebrate 50 years of Auckland studio potters

Playing with Fire: A suite of three ceramic exhibitions to celebrate 50 years of Auckland studio potters

11 March – 30 April 2011

Paying homage to the ground-breaking 20th century ceramic practices, a suite of three exhibitions put clay back on the map for a new audience in the 21st century. For 50 years Auckland Studio Potters fed the fires of ceramic work, from running an internationally prestigious award to exhibiting and teaching pottery to the local community. This commitment is acknowledged in an exhibition of works by Graeme Storm (a member since ASP’s inception) in the Gus Fisher Foyer and by an accompanying book, both of which showcase past and present practices of local ceramic legends.

Sculptor Denis O’Connor is renowned for his large-scale public and private sculptural commissions which often reference the complex details of cultural histories embedded in a site. Gallery One was devoted to his past in pottery with an installation designed by artist John Parker, centred on the potter’s wheel that once dominated O’Connor’s life.

Gallery Two featured fellow ‘clay poet’ Peter Hawkesby in an exhibition curated by ceramics enthusiast, Richard Fahey. Hawkesby, a radical ceramicist in the 1970s and 1980s, extracted clay from Te Matuku Bay Marine Reserve on Waiheke Island and fashioned from it weird but functionally useless vessels. Looking to the American Abstract Expressionists for inspiration, his work marked a decisive break with the previously dominant English pottery tradition. 

A Micronaut in the Wide World: The imaginative life and times of Graham Percy A Micronaut in the Wide World: The imaginative life and times of Graham Percy

A Micronaut in the Wide World: The imaginative life and times of Graham Percy

6 May – 25 June 2011

This exhibition showcased the charming and immensely entertaining artwork of expatriate New Zealand illustrator, designer and typographer Graham Percy (1938–2008). It drew on the artist’s comprehensive collection of work: not only his published drawings but also his many works created for family and friends. These illustrations and ‘imagined histories’ depicted an eclectic host of characters who go about their activities with strangely serene and determined attitudes—a Venetian kiwi complete with masquerade mask, Sigmund Freud in Dargaville and Johann Strauss envisaged as a hot air balloon.

Two Walk in Edinburgh: Mari Mahr

6 May – 25 June 2011

Photography is often spoken about in relation to memory or the past. In this exhibition, two series by Hungarian artist Mari Mahr (currently London/Berlin based) mapped places outside of time. Two Walk in Paris and Two Walk in Edinburgh comprised sixteen photographs, each accompanied by text from Wellington poets Gregory O’Brien and Jenny Bornholdt. Acts of walking and talking, and most significantly, looking through cities together were illustrated, recalling Mahr’s shared experiences with her late husband, Graham Percy, and their connections to each place.

Collateral: Printmaking as Social Commentary Collateral: Printmaking as Social Commentary

Collateral: Printmaking as Social Commentary

1 July – 27 August 2011

The four artists in Collateral show that printmaking's long history of social and political critique is still alive and well. From the United States, New Zealand and South Africa, printmakers Daniel Heyman, Michael Reed, Sandra Thomson and Diane Victor utilise the versatility of print processes in diverse ways that offer the traditional pleasures of fine prints and also more unexpected forms: delicate etchings and drypoints, vibrant screenprint designs on a variety of fabric supports, ingenious artist's books, and engravings on metal. But this was not only an exhibition for print lovers: these artists share the impulse to expose human rights violations, and the different stories they tell invite close reading as they focus on those who suffer not as combatants or through direct involvement in conflict, but in what may be referred to as collateral damage.

Curated by Elizabeth Rankin.

From Prague to Auckland: The photographs of Frank Hofman From Prague to Auckland: The photographs of Frank Hofman

From Prague to Auckland: The photographs of Frank Hofman

2 September – 29 October 2011

Frank Hofmann arrived in New Zealand in 1940 as a refugee from the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia. He quickly established himself as a professional photographer. In Auckland from 1941, he married Helen Shaw, a poet, short story writer and essayist, and initially worked for Clifton Firth, then the most prominent portrait photographer in the city. From 1948 to 1975 Hofmann’s day job was at Christopher Bede Studios, which became the largest commercial photographic enterprise in the country. At the same time, and largely distinct from his Bede work, Hofmann practiced ‘art’ photography. He explored the potentialities and poetics of the medium in diverse genres; portraiture, architectural, landscape, and abstract and experimental. In a period in New Zealand when photography was not generally seen in terms of art, Hofmann advocated strongly for its aesthetic values and properties in numerous articles and talks. He was also an accomplished musician, who stressed the productive interconnections between music, architecture, painting, photography and writing. Both his and Helen Shaw’s careers testify to this. A central figure in New Zealand’s mid-20th century modernising arts circles, Hofmann was a close friend and associate of such leaders in their fields as architect Vernon Brown, conductor Georg Tintner, artist Eric Lee Johnson, and writer Frank Sargeson. Frank Hofmann is particularly important for introducing the ideas and practices of Central European ‘New Photography’ into this country. He is part of a group of Central Europeans displaced by Nazism and War whose impacts on, and contributions to, New Zealand society were extensive, especially in music, photography and the promotion and patronage of the arts generally.

Curated by Len Bell.

Liyen Chong: Of Positions and half Positions having several Marks at Once Liyen Chong: Of Positions and half Positions having several Marks at Once

Liyen Chong: Of Positions and half Positions having several Marks at Once

2 September – 29 October 2011

Operating from in-between the spaces of coming and going, Liyen Chong continues her explorations of the self and consciousness through particular modes of cultural production. During her time as the McCahon House Residency Artist, Chong explored phenomenology, Eastern thought and its implications for an art practice in New Zealand. She presented the results of her inquiry in this show, which included photographic self-portraits that document private performative actions, taken with the help of a self-timer that are then digitally manipulated and then painted on. The show playfully examined the idea of self-imaging and raised serious questions about contemporary identity within New Zealand.

Crown Lynn: crockery of distinction Crown Lynn: crockery of distinction

Crown Lynn: crockery of distinction

4 November 2011 – 7 January 2012

For more than half a century, Crown Lynn ceramics have held a central place in the hearts and on the dinner tables of New Zealanders. Today, more than 20 years after Crown Lynn Potteries closed its factory in New Lynn, Auckland, Crown Lynn ceramics continue to capture the imagination of professional collectors and pottery fans alike.

This exhibition at Gus Fisher Gallery explored our obsession with this classic kiwiana brand that was once the southern hemisphere’s biggest pottery producer. Crown Lynn: Pottery for the People focused on nine different personal collections spanning tableware and hand-potted vases to production equipment. 

The Nita Gini Collection: Lauren Lysaght The Nita Gini Collection: Lauren Lysaght

The Nita Gini Collection: Lauren Lysaght

4 November 2011 – 7 January 2012

The Nita Gini Collection was an assembly of unorthodox objects, the unlikely heirs to a legacy of New Zealand’s Crown Lynn tradition. Lauren Lysaght painstakingly constructed each of the items by hand, using cardboard, plaster of Paris, wood veneer, and other found materials, and drew on the memory of her grandmother Nita Gini’s collection of ceramics. Veering dramatically from the formality with which collections are often presented, the exhibition adopted a brassy, roguish and indomitably homemade aesthetic to consider objects we often call ‘precious’, in a pleasingly irreverent light.

Top

2010

Felix Kelly: a kiwi at Brideshead Felix Kelly: a kiwi at Brideshead

Felix Kelly: a kiwi at Brideshead

26 February – 9 April 2010

Auckland born, Felix Kelly (1914-1994) fled New Zealand as a young man for the bright lights of London. He never returned, but, unlike other New Zealand expatriate painters who quickly removed their homeland from their subject matter, Kelly kept painting an increasingly misremembered New Zealand which with each new work became a more and more fantastical place.

Focussing on Kelly’s output until the mid-1960s, the exhibition ranged from paintings to book illustrations, and from cartoons to design for the stage. This body of work showed Kelly as an artist of whimsical imagination and invention. It also added a new complexity and depth to New Zealand’s art history.

Curated by Dr Don Bassett; developed and toured by Hawke's Bay Museum & Art Gallery, Napier.

Miles [Warren]: a life in architecture Miles [Warren]: a life in architecture

Miles [Warren]: a life in architecture

23 April – 29 May 2010

Sir Miles Warren, born 1929, is regarded as one of New Zealand’s leading architects and has been at the forefront of the industry for more than 40 years. He has been instrumental in the creation of many impressive and original private and public buildings throughout New Zealand and overseas. Over the years, he has focussed on integrating the disciplines of design by creating enduring and sustainable infrastructure and environments in New Zealand. He has also made a significant investment in developing specialist knowledge in ecologically sustainable building design, which has helped to provide practical guidance in large scale public and private buildings.

Nuala Gregory: Exploded View Nuala Gregory: Exploded View

Nuala Gregory: Exploded View

4 June – 17 July 2010

The work for this exhibition was produced using liquid-wash printmaking processes (both stone and plate lithography) combined with elements of collage. It was conceived in the form of an installation. Nevertheless, this was an exhibition of paintings about painting: about its histories, particularities and possibilities.

The title Exploded View refers to the way in which painting is exploded or deconstructed into component parts held up for view: as colour, as shape, as surface, or materiality. There is no attempt to represent anything ‘external’, to configure or reflect any familiar image of the world. Instead, the focus is on the labour and the effects of painting, its capacity to produce or withhold meaning, to show in its own unique way the workings of appearance and visibility. 

Looking Terrific: The Story of El Jay Looking Terrific: The Story of El Jay

Looking Terrific: The Story of El Jay

4 June – 17 July 2010

Gus Fisher and his El Jay label made high quality, elegant and up-to-the-minute clothes for all occasions, from day dresses to party dresses, and from stylish suits to essential coats. Looking Terrific was a high-end fashion business story that spanned 50 years from 1938 to 1988. It was about much more than a collection of dresses, however. While the young Queen Elizabeth was the fashion role model for most New Zealand women of the 1950s, Gus Fisher looked to the couture of Paris instead. He travelled every year to see first-hand the new designs, and to purchase the latest fabrics for El Jay. The contacts he established and his growing reputation for quality led, in 1954, to an invitation to become the licensee for Christian Dior, giving him the exclusive rights to manufacture and sell Christian Dior originals and Christian Dior prêt-à-porter in the New Zealand market. The Dior connection is one part of the El Jay story and there are many more stories about ideas, ideals and our cultural development, which the wonderful worn garments in this exhibition symbolise.

Curated by Doris de Pont.

Julian Dashper: Professional Practice Julian Dashper: Professional Practice

Julian Dashper: Professional Practice

23 July – 28 August 2010

Julian Dashper (1960-2009) once commented that it takes courage to write ‘artist’ as one’s occupation on forms. It was a statement of encouragement to the generation of students that he taught, but also a statement of his own position.

Over nearly 30 years as an exhibiting artist, Dashper built a significant body of work that is one of New Zealand’s most diverse and intriguing. Dashper’s words and works also express a lifelong engagement with New Zealand’s distance from the ‘centres’ of artistic production in Europe and America, and the consequential traffic of materials and ideas. Dashper himself became one of New Zealand’s most well-travelled artist, making frequent trips to and organising shows in Australia, Europe and the United States of America, and developing an extensive network of colleagues internationally. 

Sean Kerr: Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced Sean Kerr: Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced

Sean Kerr: Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced

3 September – 9 October 2010

Bruce danced if Victoria sang, and Victoria sang; so Bruce danced covered Sean Kerr’s work through the period 2000-2010. It recognised the instability of media art, looking back to recreate previous works, exploiting the juxtaposition of past and present to illustrate potential trajectories between works. Whether delivered live in the mode of performance, completed by the active role of the viewer, upgraded to evade redundant technology, or the simple practicality of reconfiguring an installation for a new site, Kerr’s work refuses to be fixed in time through the process of a conventional retrospective.

Presented in partnership with Artspace. 

Group Architects: Towards a New Zealand Architecture Group Architects: Towards a New Zealand Architecture

Group Architects: Towards a New Zealand Architecture

15 October – 27 November 2010

Group Architects – ‘the Group’ for short – is New Zealand’s most mythologised firm of mid-20th-century architects. They are known for their provocative calls for a specifically New Zealand architecture and for their modern houses, often characterised by exposed timbers, open-plan interiors and new attention to indoor-outdoor living. The Group operated until 1968 when founder Bill Wilson died, yet their work lives on and has been a key influence on generations of New Zealand architects.

Ruth Cleland: Mall Ruth Cleland: Mall

Ruth Cleland: Mall

15 October – 27 November 2010

Ruth Cleland’s exhibition Mall featured a series of works on paper that documented suburban shopping malls located around Auckland and Hamilton. This exhibition represented two years of work, including drawings that were completed during a three-month artist residency at the Vermont Studio Centre, USA in 2009.
Cleland's work embraced the uniformity of suburban commercial spaces. The absence of people and the removal of distinguishable details suggest that these scenes could be anywhere in New Zealand, or around the world. Images were paired together, creating compositional relationships between various mall locations and focussing attention towards particular details of these spaces. Perspectival distance shots sat alongside almost flat surfaces of detail, such as pavement or floor tiles, which were magnified to the point of abstraction. 

Simon Esling: Six Obstructions Simon Esling: Six Obstructions

Simon Esling: Six Obstructions

15 October – 27 November 2010

Le Corbusier’s proclamation in 1923 that “a house is a machine for living in” offers a valuable metaphor for discussing architecture as both mass-produced utilitarian object and potent psychological entity. To look upon architecture as a functional object one can examine its place within the mechanisation of society and how ideas of speed and efficiency have found their way into modern urbanisation. Further to this notion of ‘architecture-as-machine’ is the psychological dissonance of buildings and their influence upon the human condition: the home as machine suggests the occupant has become a cog in an uncanny device.

Pat Hanly: The Seven Ages of Man Pat Hanly: The Seven Ages of Man

Pat Hanly: The Seven Ages of Man

3 December 2010 – 8 January 2011

These seven paintings, titled The Seven Ages of Man, were commissioned from Pat Hanly by Hamish Keith for the then new Medical School ‘Link’ Building at The University of Auckland, where they have been on permanent display since 1975, ascending the building with one on each level. They have never before been exhibited publicly or seen together but were brought together for this exhibition while major refurbishments took place on the Grafton Campus.

Top Ten: new acquisitions for the University of Auckland Art Collection Top Ten: new acquisitions for the University of Auckland Art Collection

Top Ten: new acquisitions for the University of Auckland Art Collection

3 December 2010 – 5 March 2011

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2009

Edward Bullmore: A Surrealist Odyssey Edward Bullmore: A Surrealist Odyssey

Edward Bullmore: A Surrealist Odyssey

30 January – 28 February 2009

A Surrealist Odyssey was an extensive survey exhibition of Edward Bullmore, considered to be one of New Zealand's earliest surrealist visual artists. Bullmore challenged the constraints of the New Zealand's predominately nationalist art canon of the time, with his Surrealist fusion of the New Zealand landscape and the human form, and it was not until he travelled to Europe and England that he achieved success as an artist.

Transform: The Abstract Art of Milan Mrkusich Transform: The Abstract Art of Milan Mrkusich

Transform: The Abstract Art of Milan Mrkusich

6 March – 2 May 2009

Many-hued, vibrant and strong, Milan Mrkusich's abstract paintings have impressed viewers for half a century. Curated by Alan Wright and Edward Hanfling, this selection of major paintings provided a new reading of Mrkusich as an alchemical transformer of media and materials. This major exhibition provided a unique opportunity to study firsthand the deployment of symbolic form, line and colour in Mrkusich's painting over four decades. 

Transform examined the interrelationship of form and content in the work of New Zealand's foremost abstract painter. Although Mrkusich’s paintings have often been explained in purely formal (visual) terms, they were never intended to be just the sum of their physical components. Mrkusich believes meaning and form are inseparable, and that content emerges from the artist’s encounter with his materials. The works on show reflect Mrkusich’s interests in Alchemy and the notion of art as an act of transformation. 

Antarctica: Joyce Campbell / Anne Noble / Connie Samaras Antarctica: Joyce Campbell / Anne Noble / Connie Samaras

Antarctica: Joyce Campbell / Anne Noble / Connie Samaras

8 May – 2 June 2009

Antarctica brought together work by Joyce Campbell, Anne Noble, and Connie Samaras on the subject of Antarctica, the most extreme continent on the planet. Artist residencies enabled each of them to photograph and experience first-hand the severe and almost inhuman conditions. Each artist's work approached the subject with differing yet overlapping frameworks, creating a transcultural dialogue that sought to de-exoticise a landscape that has been romanticised, idealised, and made epic.

Sandra Bushby: Absent Jewels

8 May – 20 June 2009

Since 2003 Sandra Bushby has been exploring embroidery and its associations with value, history and adornment. Absent Jewels explored the currency of the handmade through painstakingly embroidering the interior spaces of jewellery boxes – spaces traditionally reserved for precious and rare gemstones. Earlier works looked at these gems more directly, reformatting them as small embroideries which blur the line between jewellery and sculpture. Toured by Hawkes Bay Museum & Art Gallery.

Ann Shelton: room room Ann Shelton: room room

Ann Shelton: room room

8 May – 20 June 2009

room room explored the idea of reflection: firstly, in the act of mirroring, mimicking reality through inversion, and secondly, in the notion of interiority. Shelton's photographs explored the complex history of the Salvation Army's former Rotoroa Island Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Centre. Referencing the 18th century Claude glass, the artist presented a new set of spaces for contemplation, investigation, and for the archive.

room room was first exhibited at City Gallery Wellington in 2008.

From Perfumery to Radio Station: The Evolution of an Auckland Architectural Practice From Perfumery to Radio Station: The Evolution of an Auckland Architectural Practice

From Perfumery to Radio Station: The Evolution of an Auckland Architectural Practice

3 July – 15 August 2009

This selection of drawings from the Auckland firm of Matthews and Matthews Architects documented the evolution of architectural practice over 130 years. This collection encompasses the partnership of Wade & Bartley, who in 1934 designed the 1YA building which is now The University of Auckland’s Kenneth Myers Centre where the Gus Fisher Gallery is housed. Cabinetmaker Henry Greensmith Wade’s tools of trade, including his inlaid marquetry toolbox, were presented alongside his exquisite hand-drawn pen and wash drawings on paper from the 1880s, which include a design for a Queen Street perfume manufactory. The complete set of drawings in pen and ink on linen for the 1YA building were displayed in the Gus Fisher Gallery’s foyer.

New Zealand Architecture in Perspective: 150 Years of Architectural Drawing New Zealand Architecture in Perspective: 150 Years of Architectural Drawing

New Zealand Architecture in Perspective: 150 Years of Architectural Drawing

3 July – 15 August 2009

An architectural perspective presents not what the eye sees, but a pictorial representation of a building. Unlike an orthogonal drawing, in which the vanishing point is assumed to be at infinity, it is subjective, rather than objective. Although a perspective drawing should always serve the building represented, rather than being an excuse for a bravura display of drafting, many are compelling works of art in their own right.

The aim of this exhibition was to explore New Zealand’s rich collection of perspective drawings to gain a unique view on our architectural past. Many were important designs that had been destroyed or were never built. Some appeared in unfamiliar forms. At a time when digital drafting techniques are rendering the traditional perspective obsolete it has become timely to look back on a disappearing art form and to be reminded of the need to preserve those which remain as an integral part of our architectural heritage. 

AC/DC: The Art of Power AC/DC: The Art of Power

AC/DC: The Art of Power

21 August – 3 October 2009

AC/DC was a high-voltage exhibition of switched-on art that explored the social, corporate and political power structures which inform the ways we think about and use energy. The works in this show not only relied on different forms of energy production and consumption, they foreground and critiqued the implications and possibilities of these systems, and the politics inherent in them.

Artists included were Billy Apple, Wayne Barrar, Mary-Louise Browne, Bill Culbert, Disinformation, Brett Graham and Rachael Rakena, Joanna Langford, Mary Morrison and Joe Sheehan. The exhibition also included a listening programme and screenings.

Emory Douglas, Minister of Culture, Black Panther Party Emory Douglas, Minister of Culture, Black Panther Party

Emory Douglas, Minister of Culture, Black Panther Party

21 August – 3 October 2009

American artist Emory Douglas created the striking graphic images that came to represent the Black Panther Party in the 1960s and 1970s. Symbolising the civil unrest of the times, his images were used to illustrate the Black Panther, the party’s weekly newspaper. Over the years, the Black Panther’s ‘Revolutionary Artist’ made countless artworks, illustrations, and cartoons, which were reproduced in the paper and distributed as prints, posters, cards and sculptures. Thanks in large part to Emory Douglas’ powerful visuals, the Black Panther Party delivered a forceful message to a community ravaged by poverty, police brutality, and poor living conditions.

Marti Friedlander: Looking Closely Marti Friedlander: Looking Closely

Marti Friedlander: Looking Closely

9 October – 21 November 2009

Marti Friedlander (born 1928) has been taking photographs for over fifty years – in England, Europe and Israel first, before landing in New Zealand in 1958. She is one of our best-known photographers, while in recent years her work has been attracting increasingly enthusiastic attention in Europe, USA and Australia.

Yet most of her photographs are either un-published or little-known. This exhibition and book addressed that situation by making public many hitherto unseen or rarely seen images. Both exhibition and book offered a new look at Marti Friedlander’s work in its diversity of subject and geographical or cultural scope; portraits, architecture, street photographs, socio-political events, the beach, migration and travel, self-picturings.

Art That Moves: the work of Len Lye Art That Moves: the work of Len Lye

Art That Moves: the work of Len Lye

27 November 2009 – 6 February 2010

Visitors to this exhibition were to discover the art of Len Lye (1901 - 1980), one of the most radical creative minds of the modern age. This unforgettably exuberant exhibition surveyed his work across film, sculpture, painting, poetry and more. Exploding with kaleidoscopic colour and pulsing with rhythmic beats, the exhibition coincides with the launch of a book by Roger Horrocks with the same name.

New Zealand-born Len Lye is a seminal figure in the history of the moving image. In his early twenties, Lye travelled throughout the South Pacific, and lived for extended periods in Australia and Samoa. Moving to London in the 1920s, and then New York in the 1940s, Len Lye's career unfolded amidst avant garde modernism on the international stage.

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2008

Adele Younghusband: A New Zealand Surrealist Adele Younghusband: A New Zealand Surrealist

Adele Younghusband: A New Zealand Surrealist

15 February – 8 March 2008

Initially making a living as a photographer, Adele Younghusband (born in 1878 on a Waikato farm) maintained a painting practice for most of her life. Divorced, and with bobbed hair, she attracted notice in Northland where she operated her photographic businesses. After travelling to Australia to study art with George Bell, she produced linocuts and paintings which captured the spirit of Art Deco with their curving rhythms and bright colours. Her complex body of work includes themes from Māori mythology, religious symbolism, allegory, and modern life depicted in styles which range from cubism through symbolist surrealism to conventional landscape.

Gabrielle Hope (1916-1962): Lyric Watercolours Gabrielle Hope (1916-1962): Lyric Watercolours

Gabrielle Hope (1916-1962): Lyric Watercolours

15 February – 7 April 2008

Although born in Lower Hutt, Gabrielle Hope spent most of her life in Auckland, painting nearby landscapes and exhibiting at the Auckland Art Gallery and Auckland Society of Arts. Her work demonstrated a growing interest in mysticism, occult traditions of the East and West, and Chinese painting. Initially reluctant to show her work publicly and only living to the age of 46, Hope had a brief career but was encouraged by leading artists such as Colin McCahon and Eric Lee-Johnson, collected by Charles Brasch and represented by Peter Webb as one of his first dealer shows. Since her death, there have been several retrospectives but this is the first in a public gallery and is accompanied by the first substantial publication on her work.

Stations of the Cross Stations of the Cross

Stations of the Cross

14 March – 24 March 2008

For this unique 15 fifteen contemporary New Zealand artists were invited to create a new, original work in response to one of the Stations of the Cross. The artists involved held a range of religious beliefs and were asked to respond from whichever point of view, and in whatever form, they chose. The result was an unconventional and non-denominational series of works with contributions by some of New Zealand’s most acclaimed contemporary artists.

Kumamoto Artpolis: Architecture through communication Kumamoto Artpolis: Architecture through communication

Kumamoto Artpolis: Architecture through communication

26 March – 1 April 2008

The Kumamoto Artpolis is an ambitious public architecture programme established in southern Japan in 1988 as an innovative attempt to bring new architectural concepts to communities throughout Kumamoto Prefecture. The goal is not simply to improve the quality of building design but to use architectural projects to bring together architects and local residents. Through the construction of high-quality architecture the project aims to create and revitalise an enduring cultural heritage firmly rooted in the region which can be passed on to future generations. The programme has produced almost 100 buildings, including key projects by internationally significant architects – figures such as Tadao Ando, Toyo Ito and Kazuyo Sejima.

Along with introducing representative works by architects who have participated in the project, this exhibition examined the role architecture has played or ought to play in developing communities and increasing regional vitality.

Art-Speak: Works from The University of Auckland Art Collection Art-Speak: Works from The University of Auckland Art Collection

Art-Speak: Works from The University of Auckland Art Collection

11 April – 24 May 2008

Begun in 1966 with the acquisition of a Colin McCahon drawing, The University of Auckland Art Collection has grown to more than 500 works that represent a unique cross-section of New Zealand’s art history as well as a visual record of The University’s history. For this exhibition, held in The University’s 125th year, recent acquisitions and classic works were brought together from around the campus for a rare combined viewing.

Denys Watkins: Delhi Drawings Denys Watkins: Delhi Drawings

Denys Watkins: Delhi Drawings

11 April – 24 May 2008

These works were executed in January and February 2003 while Denys Watkins undertook a Creative New Zealand residency amidst the swirling cold mists at Sanskriti Kendra in South Delhi, India. Painted with acrylic and oxide on Indian handmade papers, the references in the work draw their identity loosely from the environs of the nearby village Mehrauli, an important archaeological site. Watkins’ ongoing preoccupation with the painted word led to a fascination with local hand-made signs and the distinctive iconography of the area.

“After a period of orientation and disorientation, the source of these drawings has been realised by the day to day existence in a neighbouring village and the evolving progress that moves in on tradition,” Watkins said. “The drawings have been made as a discipline without a particular intention, reflecting the role of the artist as a sign painter, and the making from intuition and the unconscious.”

Rosangela Tenorio: Architectural Tempo

11 April – 17 May 2008

The images in this exhibition documented glimpses of extraordinary modern and traditional architecture and urban spaces of India, from Kolkata to Trivandrum. Led by signs of human occupation, they revealed movement, patterns, texture, light, found objects, neglected architectural details and spaces. Daily activities were superimposed into the viewer’s eyes, as architecture became a background in motion, where subject and object could not be disconnected, and were reinforced by positioning and tempo. The presented photographs were taken during architectural research trips to India in 2007 by Rosangela Tenorio, a Senior Lecturer at The University of Auckland’s School of Architecture & Planning.

Close-up: Contemporary Contact Prints Close-up: Contemporary Contact Prints

Close-up: Contemporary Contact Prints

31 May – 5 July 2008

Although generally considered a historic technique, especially prominent in the 19th century, many photographers are now using qualities of the contact print as an important part of their practice. Part of a return to traditional processes, contact prints reflect very particular and individualistic concerns, including those which necessitate contemplation and a belief in the unity of technique and expression. In comparison to the more common process of enlargement, contact prints are made by placing the printing paper directly in contact with the negative. The result is an impressively sharp image, but it is only the same size as the negative so unwieldy cameras that can take a large negative are required.

Curated by Paul McNamara, this exhibition was accompanied by a catalogue introduced by Athol McCredie. Artists featured in the exhibition were: Laurence Aberhart, Mark Adams, Wayne Barrar, Joyce Campbell, Ben Cauchi, Darren Glass, Fiona Pardington, Andrew Ross and Haruhiko Sameshima.

The Hidden Faces of War: New Zealand’s Great War Medical Photography The Hidden Faces of War: New Zealand’s Great War Medical Photography

The Hidden Faces of War: New Zealand’s Great War Medical Photography

31 May – 5 July 2008

This was an exhibition of compelling photos from the Macalister collection, selected by Dr Sandy Callister from her new book The Face of War: New Zealand’s Great War Photography, published by Auckland University Press. Under the auspices of New Zealand surgeon Sir Harold Gillies, the Queen’s Hospital, as it was then known, was purpose built in Sidcup, Britain as the First World War’s major centre for plastic surgery. Gillies used photography to document his cases because it was accurate, fast and permanent. As a consequence, the Macalister collection holds the records of 295 New Zealand soldiers who underwent reconstructive plastic surgery for facial injuries incurred on the Western Front. These images represent a crucial punctuation point in the iconography of this war; one which brings us eyeball-to-eyeball with the wounded. The resurfacing of this hitherto unknown New Zealand medical archive, whose own survival has been precarious, allowed us to see what has been hidden from this country’s war memory.

Becky Nunes: Mau Moko

24 May - 7 June 2008

Working in collaboration with the authors of recently published book Mau Moko: The World of Māori Tattoo, a study of the history and renaissance of Māori tattoo, photographer Becky Nunes travelled extensively through the North and South Islands making contemporary portraits of those who wear and practice ta moko.

Peter Madden and Sam Sampson: Zeroed Peter Madden and Sam Sampson: Zeroed

Peter Madden and Sam Sampson: Zeroed

13 June – 5 July 2008

June 2008 saw the release of Everything Talks, a poetry collection by Sam Sampson through AUP, which featured a cover by artist Peter Madden and works from their 2006 collaboration The Deep End. For this exhibition, Madden and Sampson produced new collaborative works, which continue their shared exploration of collage methodology and was shown alongside existing works.

Swarm: A peek into the hive-mind of group dynamics Swarm: A peek into the hive-mind of group dynamics

Swarm: A peek into the hive-mind of group dynamics

11 July – 17 August 2008

The Swarm was an exhibition that explored the complexities of collective intelligence, networked manoeuvres and crowd control. It took its title and point-of-departure from the 1978 Irwin Allen film, which depicted a mutant strain of African bees that threatened to take over America. As a successor to Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds, it continued the theme of many apocalypse films before and after to undermine the sense of control adult humans maintain over their environment. These stories built tension by questioning what would happen if the ordinarily benign phenomena that continually surround and outnumber us, such as insects, rabbits, frogs, piranhas, children, computers or tomatoes, decided to organise against us. 

New Vision: The New Vision Gallery 1965-1976 New Vision: The New Vision Gallery 1965-1976

New Vision: The New Vision Gallery 1965-1976

11 July – 16 August 2008

Curated by Joanna Trezise.

Speed of Sound: Motions and Journeys Speed of Sound: Motions and Journeys

Speed of Sound: Motions and Journeys

21 – 24 August 2008

Speed of Sound acknowledged the movement inherent in both the production and reception of sound. Listening also plays an important role in our sense of space and place, whether it is through our (conscious or subconscious) awareness of the sound ecology we inhabit, or being transported to destinations real or imagined through recordings and sonic interventions. 

Artists included: Alex Bennett, Kaleb Bennett, Jasmine Chen, Tim Coster, John Coulter, Richard Francis, Sam Hamilton, Stephen Matthews, James McCarthy, DJN, Charlotte Rose, David Rylands and Clinton Watkins

Chris Marker: Owls at Noon Prelude: The Hollow Men Chris Marker: Owls at Noon Prelude: The Hollow Men

Chris Marker: Owls at Noon Prelude: The Hollow Men

29 August – 4 October 2008

Born in 1921, French director Chris Marker has been making films since the 1950s. A pioneer of the film-essay, his approach developed out of his early experiences making travel books, combining images with texts. His big subjects include memory and travel, which he explores in relation to his media: film and photography.

Fiona Amundsen: Miracle on the Han River Fiona Amundsen: Miracle on the Han River

Fiona Amundsen: Miracle on the Han River

17 October - 22 November 2008

This exhibition featured photographs of the Cheonggyecheon stream, a tributary running of the Han River, which runs through downtown Seoul, and surrounding areas of the city. These were taken during a two-month Asian New Zealand Foundation residency Fiona Amundsen undertook in early 2008. The particular area Amundsen focussed on has recently undergone major redevelopment and represents both traditional and contemporary aspects of Korean culture, where palaces sit alongside skyscrapers and recreational areas. This is indicative of the massive cultural, social, economic and technological growth experienced by South Korea since the Korean Civil War in the mid-20th century. This project continued Amundsen's exploration of public sites, such as Cheonggyecheon, and the socio-cultural readings brought to these images through the medium of photography.

Long Live the Modern: New Zealand's New Architecture, 1904-1984 Long Live the Modern: New Zealand's New Architecture, 1904-1984

Long Live the Modern: New Zealand's New Architecture, 1904-1984

17 October - 22 November 2008

Surveying New Zealand’s extant modern buildings, this exhibition focussed on a smaller number of the published projects and brought together original drawings and period books, journals and photographs, as well as new architectural models and recent photographs. Increasingly, modern buildings are being recognised for their heritage values. But many people remain unaccustomed to hearing ‘modern’ and ‘heritage’ in the same sentence. Long Live the Modern used the word ‘modern’ in a very broad way, pursuing 20th-century architectural initiatives concerned with the new – new technologies, new materials, new forms, new building types, new ways of living – initiatives embedded with the belief that the new would necessarily change lives in positive ways.

Curated by Julia Gatley and Bill McKay, School of Architecture and Planning.

The Power of Portraiture The Power of Portraiture

The Power of Portraiture

28 November 2008 – 24 January 2009

The Power of Portraiture celebrated the successes of New Zealand’s history-shapers over the centuries. The exhibition encompassed some 40 portraits of major public figures, male and female, Māori and Pakeha, conservative and liberal, from a number of different professional backgrounds. They all had a shared identity as leaders of this country, in a multitude of different ways.
How we perceive leadership has changed over the years. The use of portraiture to reflect the image of ‘power’ and ‘authority’ has also had to change to reflect the differences in values and leadership styles.
Organised to coincide with the 7th International Conference on Studying Leadership (for the first time ever being hosted outside of the Northern Hemisphere at The University of Auckland, 7 – 9 December 2008), the exhibition complemented the more academic insights of leadership by providing an alternative point of access for members of the public to debate and question the role of leadership in today’s society.

Curated by Erin Griffey. 

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2007

Painting for Joy: New Japanese Painting in the 1990s Painting for Joy: New Japanese Painting in the 1990s

Painting for Joy: New Japanese Painting in the 1990s

19 January – 3 February 2007

Painting for Joy: New Japanese Painting in the 1990s was a touring exhibition featuring work from a generation of Japanese artists all born around 1960, including internationally acclaimed artists Takashi Murakami and Yoshitomo Nara.

Painting for Joy showed how young Japanese artists have understood and tried to further develop artistic expression in painting during the final decade of the 20th century, a period of dramatic growth in Japan both culturally and economically.

Toured by the Japan Foundation and with the support of the Consulate-General of Japan

Asian at Wheel Asian at Wheel

Asian at Wheel

19 January – 3 February 2007

Asian at Wheel presented a selection of Auckland-based Japanese artists curated by Ryuzo Nishida. Their multi-disciplinary works (drawing, video, moving image, photography, sculpture, performance) attempted to show how a new generation of Japanese artists, educated in New Zealand, have been influenced by the Japanese contemporary artists of the 1990s, a time of rapid development in information networks and communications technology.

Japanese artist Ryuzo Nishida came to New Zealand in 1997. He won the Adam Portraiture Award in 2004 with a self-portrait made with painted nails hammered into a computer enhanced photograph. The prize included a commission to create a portrait of Rt Hon Jonathan Hunt, which Nishida, also renowned for working with chocolate, produced from pebble stones.

James Ross: The Red Studio James Ross: The Red Studio

James Ross: The Red Studio

9 February – 2 March 2007

James Ross’s exhibition The Red Studio explored the artist’s work of the last 25 years through the ‘chromatic constant’ red, providing the viewer with a lens with which to view the entirety of Ross’s painting activity from the period 1982-2006. As exhibition curator Luke Smythe explained in his The Red Studio catalogue essay, for 25 years now James Ross has been exploring the fertile zone of artistic production that lies between painting and sculpture. Unconventional supports have long been important to Ross, who from the beginning of his career was eager to jettison the omnipresent rectangular canvas that dominated the modern Western painting tradition.

Curated by Luke Smythe. 

Peter Gibson Smith: Speaking of Tongues

9 February – 2 March 2007

Fronting up to the Corporates: Elam Art Upfront Fronting up to the Corporates: Elam Art Upfront

Fronting up to the Corporates: Elam Art Upfront

9 – 23 March 2007

In collaboration with the Gus Fisher Gallery, a cluster of high-rises on Shortland Street in Auckland’s CBD provided their foyers and lobbies as exhibition spaces for Elam: Art Upfront. Normally the domain of ‘blue chip’ artists, these foyers were overtaken with the work of some of Auckland’s freshest and most exciting artists, showcasing work by current Elam students as well as recent graduates. 

The artworks in Elam: Art Upfront worked both with and against the spaces, aiming to challenge the restraints of the foyer environment and inviting the public to enquire and broaden their attitudes as they confronted works that extended beyond the stable ‘corporate conversation pieces’. Contemporary art plays a critical role in modern society. It keeps communities vibrant by encouraging a healthy level of debate and change and Elam: Art Upfront addressed this challenge.

Curated by Pennie Hunt. 

turbulence: the 3rd Auckland Triennial turbulence: the 3rd Auckland Triennial

turbulence: the 3rd Auckland Triennial

9 March – 28 April 2007

The Auckland Triennial was New Zealand’s premier international contemporary art event. This multi-venue exhibition presented major works by over 35 artists from more than 20 countries. The 3rd Auckland Triennial addressed the condition of turbulence – the complex and unpredictable cultural and political environment in which we live. The artists in this exhibition engaged with the emotional flux of their daily reality, responding to the ambient hopes and fears in our midst. They created aesthetic interventions – active, vital and alternative ways of looking at the world around us.  

A Charming City by John Radford A Charming City by John Radford

A Charming City by John Radford

1 May 2007

Ralph Hotere Figurative Works: Carnival, Song Cycle and the Woman Series Ralph Hotere Figurative Works: Carnival, Song Cycle and the Woman Series

Ralph Hotere Figurative Works: Carnival, Song Cycle and the Woman Series

4 May – 2 June 2007

Rarely seen artworks by one of New Zealand’s most respected artists, Ralph Hotere, were included in this show. The exhibition comprised approximately 70 drawings and paintings, mostly from the artist’s personal collection. Entitled Ralph Hotere Figurative Works: Carnival, Song Cycle and the Woman Series, the collection featured works from various periods of the artist’s life.

Curated by Kriselle Baker.

Stephen Farthing, Hood Fellow: Leaf to Leopard

4 May – 2 June 2007

Gordon H. Brown: Hotel North America Gordon H. Brown: Hotel North America

Gordon H. Brown: Hotel North America

8 June – 14 July 2007

Hotel North America was the first exhibition of new prints of black and white photographs taken by Gordon H. Brown during a 1974 trip to the United States and Canada. They were taken whenever he had film left in the camera after photographing display units and techniques in the art museums and institutions he visited. These images provided visual essays that collectively spoke of the subtle variations between locations, as well as Brown’s response to these nuances during his first (and only) major trip abroad.

Moving Still: Contemporary New Zealand Photography from the collection of Paul McNamara Moving Still: Contemporary New Zealand Photography from the collection of Paul McNamara

Moving Still: Contemporary New Zealand Photography from the collection of Paul McNamara

8 June – 14 July 2007

An exhibition examining the zone between the still  and the moving image; to draw attention to how differently we view a photograph compared to moving images.
Most of the exhibited works were based on the photographer, Paul McNamara’s desire to capture a sense of movement, despite photographs being “a neat slice of time”.
We have not included work where a sense of movement is merely a consequence of a longer exposure time.

When the camera shutter opens, the world and its image are one – the shutter closes, the world moves on. 

Clean Machine: Homages to engineering in contemporary art Clean Machine: Homages to engineering in contemporary art

Clean Machine: Homages to engineering in contemporary art

20 July – 1 September 2007

In 1934, the Machine Art exhibition at New York's Museum of Modern Art promoted commodity designs that revealed the inner workings of things instead of hiding them behind contrived facades. Influential ideas were German Bauhaus ‘functionalism’ (form follows function), and the austere, so-called ‘international style’. Contemporary New Zealand art that emulates or replicates commodity design were brought together in Clean Machine: the look of Sarah Munro’s Prototypes suggests that they might be useful without any actual function being specified; Anton Parsons makes giant sculptures which reproduce machine-based codes; Gina Jones draws on her architectural training to produce practical-looking wall panels that use laser-cut steel, sandblasted Perspex and LED lights to replicate breathing; Scott Eady replicates the pragmatic aesthetic of industrial art from the Soviet era to create a set of toys for a Russian child prodigy; Sara Hughes handpaints the distortions of computer screens while Aiko Groot’s kinetic sculptures endlessly reconfigure simple geometric forms re-humanising the technical and mechanical by searching for the personality in the machine.

Curated by Nicole Edwards and Linda Tyler.

Rohan Wealleans: King Fisher Rohan Wealleans: King Fisher

Rohan Wealleans: King Fisher

20 July – 1 September 2007

While the Fisher King is the guardian of the Holy Grail, Rohan Wealleans is the King Fisher, pulling images of orgasming women and whole arks of exotic animals out of the ocean of image possibilities, and in the process, desecrating the idea of painting as the creation of pure and inviolate surfaces.

In association with the launch of the publication Rohan Wealleans: Let’s Make the Fire Turn Green.

Coco Fusco: Operation Atropos Coco Fusco: Operation Atropos

Coco Fusco: Operation Atropos

20 July – 1 September 2007

Curated by Caroline Vercoe.

Boy from Tree: Works by David Parcell Boy from Tree: Works by David Parcell

Boy from Tree: Works by David Parcell

7 – 12 September 2007

Boy From Tree was a posthumous celebration of the creative talent of David Parcell. A student of The University of Auckland School of Architecture (2003 to 2005), the exhibition presented a collection of architectural works in addition to three illustrated children's storybooks. Parcell's inspirational design narratives, drawings and models will leave an indelible mark.

Endless Loop: Veronica Crockford Pound and Charles Ninow Endless Loop: Veronica Crockford Pound and Charles Ninow

Endless Loop: Veronica Crockford Pound and Charles Ninow

7 – 12 September 2007

Utilising the mediums of time-based media and installation, Auckland artists Veronica Crockford Pound and Charles Ninow evoke themes of movement, metamorphosis and entropy. The exhibition title Endless Loop, refered to a computer programing term, sometimes called an infinite loop. This also aligns with Friedrich Nietzsche’s philosophy of ‘eternal recurrence’ – an endless recycling of all that is, with the acknowledgment of nothing beyond this recycling. This philosophy resonates in observances of nature: sustainability, the earth and planets circling the sun, the moon rotating around the earth and the tides of the ocean.

Curated by Clare Ullenberg.

Geoff Thornley: Constructions 1978-1982 Geoff Thornley: Constructions 1978-1982

Geoff Thornley: Constructions 1978-1982

7 September – 7 October 2007

Geoff Thornley is one of few New Zealand painters to have never deviated from pure abstraction since he adopted the mode 30 years ago. In contrast to the illusionary effects and painterly pools of light and texture of other series of his works, the Constructions are a group of concrete physical forms. They come from a discrete period within Thornley’s career and this show, curated by William McAloon, brought together 40 of these works for their first exhibition as a group. 

Colin McCahon: The Titirangi Years

13 – 20 September 2007

Curated by Peter Simpson.

The Biggest Fish The Biggest Fish

The Biggest Fish

17 – 22 September 2007

This title refers to a passage in Gilles Deleuze’s text, ‘Difference and Repetition’ which suggests only the biggest or most prominent ideas make an impact. Central to this is the idea that things become reduced to oppositional outcomes, good and bad; theory and experience; art and decoration. Grand or soothing narratives tend to overshadow the smaller dialogues and things that make up the whole. It is perhaps a reasonable impulse to try to make something coherent out of ‘the blooming, buzzing confusion’ of the world. Yet in doing so, the imprecise or the unexplained becomes edited/removed and extraneous. In a way, it becomes easier to defer to these models rather than accommodate the details or flux of the real.

Liyen Chong:  A Humid Day Liyen Chong: A Humid Day

Liyen Chong:  A Humid Day

17 – 22 September

From company logos to product packaging, Liyen Chong playfully tampers with the papery detritus that inundates our contemporary lives. With an eye for prosaic graphic designs, Chong’s replicated ‘bits and pieces’ tender a quirky twist on everyday experiences. A vodka bottle obliges us to “Learn how to speak incoherently” and a passport stamp suggests that we “Take something to pass the time”.  Both cultural criticisms and fantastic absurdities were threaded throughout this wily collection of proverbial stuff.

Curated by Kate Brettkelly-Chalmers

Metro/Canon 2007 Young Photographers Awards

20 – 27 September 2007

In conjunction with the Auckland Festival of Photography. 

Philippe Antonello: Cinema 1994-2007 Philippe Antonello: Cinema 1994-2007

Philippe Antonello: Cinema 1994-2007

28 September – 6 October 2007

An award-winning Italian photographer who has worked on the film sets of such renowned directors as Mel Gibson, Spike Lee and Ridley Scott was a Hood Fellow at The University of Auckland.

Philippe Antonella was born in Geneva in 1968 and has been a professional set photographer since 1993, when his cinematic career began on the set of acclaimed Italian filmmaker Silvio Soldini.

Curated by Bernadette Luciano and in conjunction with the Italian Film Festival. 

Tony Lane: The Watchers

8 – 12 October 2007

An exhibition of recent works by Tony Lane to accompany the launch of the Holloway Press publication Collected Poems by Charles Spear.

Vernon Brown: from the Architecture Archive Vernon Brown: from the Architecture Archive

Vernon Brown: from the Architecture Archive

12 October – 24 November 2007

In the middle of the 20th century, maverick personalities prevailed at Auckland University’s School of Architecture. Dominating teaching there for 22 years was a tall Englishman with abundant energy, a caustic turn of phrase, and an enthusiasm for all things characteristic of his adopted country – Vernon Brown. Often credited with inventing a vernacular style of building based on the bach, he took a firm stand against buildings that spoke with foreign accents, advocating preservation of the familiar kiwi twang.

John Reynolds: Speaking Truth to Power John Reynolds: Speaking Truth to Power

John Reynolds: Speaking Truth to Power

12 October – 24 November 2007

When commissioned by Laurence Simmons to provide a cover image for the Auckland University Press book, Speaking Truth to Power: Public Intellectuals Rethink New Zealand John Reynolds had such fun that he produced a complete portfolio of works exploring aspects of intellectual life in New Zealand. Although reproduced in black-and-white for the book, this irreverent set of works were shown in this exhibition in their full glory for the first time.

John Reynolds: I Tell You Solemnly John Reynolds: I Tell You Solemnly

John Reynolds: I Tell You Solemnly

12 October – 24 November 2007

John Reynolds produced a new site-specific work for the foyer in response to the gallery’s dramatic architecture. I Tell You Solemnly borrowed its name and texts from a poem by Anne Kennedy. This painted installation continued in the tradition of Reynolds’ popular work Cloud, a consideration of the presence of language, which he produced for the 2006 Sydney Biennale.

Deborah Smith: Portrait of a Marriage Deborah Smith: Portrait of a Marriage

Deborah Smith: Portrait of a Marriage

30 November – 22 December 2007

For exactly one year (from one wedding anniversary to the next) Deborah Smith took a photograph every day. She said this was an uncharacteristically disciplined project; sometimes it was a pleasure and sometimes just an obligation. A surprisingly personal and introspective process, she also found the growing archive of everyday detritus to be equally profound and banal with its incidental observations of the accoutrements of a marriage and the passing of time. Portrait of a Marriage brought into question the relationship between a photographer and her subject, implicating those people and objects that fall into her frame as elements of self-portraiture and autobiography. Although quite formal in its approach, this exhibition also had an inherent sense of intimacy and poetry, nuanced by the poetics of candid details.

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2006

Hermann Glöckner: Works 1909-1985

21 February – 31 March 2006

An exhibition of the Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen/ Institute for Cultural Relations.

Max Gimblett: Zen Reality Max Gimblett: Zen Reality

Max Gimblett: Zen Reality

21 February – 31 March 2006

Curated by Linda Tyler in conjunction with Max Gimblett. 

Douglas MacDiarmid: mid-century modernist

7 April – 19 May 2006

Curated by Linda Tyler.

Family Portraits: paintings by Jacqueline Fahey Family Portraits: paintings by Jacqueline Fahey

Family Portraits: paintings by Jacqueline Fahey

19 April – 21 May 2006

Arcing from sisters squabbling over skirts to peace activism, the trajectory of subjects in these twelve paintings was always both personal and political. As committed to painting now as she was seven decades ago when she enrolled at the School of Art in Christchurch in 1946, Jacqueline Fahey is driven by the need to communicate. The author of a two-part memoir published by Auckland University Press (Something for the Birds, 2006 and Before I Forget 2012) she also published a fictionalised account of her sojourn in Fiji during the 1987 coup, (Cutting Loose 1998) and is at work on a new novel entitled The Fenian’s Assassin. For five years before the death of her husband psychiatrist Fraser McDonald in 1994, she was on the staff of The University of Auckland, teaching painting at Elam School of Fine Arts.

Curated by Linda Tyler. 

Phoenix: An Exhibition of Work by Elam Staff

3 - 19 May 2006

Perpetual Verdure: photographs from The University of Auckland Art Collection Perpetual Verdure: photographs from The University of Auckland Art Collection

Perpetual Verdure: photographs from The University of Auckland Art Collection

26 May – 7 July 2006

Curated by Pennie Hunt. 

George Chance: a New Zealand Pictorialist George Chance: a New Zealand Pictorialist

George Chance: a New Zealand Pictorialist

26 May – 7 July 2006

Past Present: the visionary architecture of W.H. Gummer (1884-1966) Past Present: the visionary architecture of W.H. Gummer (1884-1966)

Past Present: the visionary architecture of W.H. Gummer (1884-1966)

14 July – 25 August 2006

William Henry Gummer (1884-1966) was the sixth child born in a Mount Eden family of eight. Showing early skill at drawing, he was apprenticed in 1900 to architect W.A. Holman (1864-1949), a specialist in the Edwardian Baroque. Finishing his articles in 1908, he saved enough to travel to England to study at the Royal Academy of Arts for three years and found work with the prestigious architect of New Delhi, Edwin Lutyens (1869-1944) on the designs for Castle Drogo in Devon. With Lutyens, he gathered the experience to become an Associate of the Royal Institute of British Architects by 1912. Returning to New Zealand via a short period of employ in the Chicago offices of skyscraper architect Daniel Burnham, Gummer joined Hoggard & Prouse in Auckland in 1913. That he immediately became their leading designer is unsurprising, given the expertise evident in the 1914 New Zealand Insurance Building in Queen Street (now Guardian Trust). In 1923, at Taihape, William Gummer married Edith Oiroa Batley. That was also the year he established an architectural partnership with Charles Reginald Ford (1880-1972), which was to last until 1961 when both men retired. 

Sky walls: Sculpture by Neil Dawson from the University of Auckland Art Collection

14 July – 13 September 2006

Barbree Western: Home to Roost

15 July – 13 September 2006

Onsight: Celebrating the 125th Jubilee of Teacher Education in Auckland

19 September – 15 October 2006

visible / invisible

19 September – 15 October 2006

Artworks from the University of Auckland’s Art Collection. Curated by students from the Art History Department. 

Graphics

20 October – 1 December 2006

Featuring work by Dylan Horrocks and Dick Frizzell. 

Kamaka: The Ceramics of Bruce and Estelle Martin Kamaka: The Ceramics of Bruce and Estelle Martin

Kamaka: The Ceramics of Bruce and Estelle Martin

20 October – 22 December 2006

Kamaka: The Ceramics of Bruce and Estelle Martin celebrated the 40-year career of two Hastings potters whose work took many national ceramic prizes and in 1984 was shown at a prestigious exhibition in Osaka, Japan.

Always interested in the Japanese ceramic tradition, Bruce and Estelle made a three-month trip there in 1978, staying in ryokans, visiting potteries and meeting with Japanese potters and collectors. On their return they built a large Japanese style anagama kiln on their property. From 1982 to 1990 they fired their anagama kiln once a year for a period of twelve days, each firing was an exhausting business. Their son, Craig recalled that “by the end you can’t think straight. Firing an anagama is wildly dramatic and intense. It gets very hot, it smells, it belches smoke and flame, it’s disobedient.” 

Vavau: Tales of Ancient Samoa by Shigeyuki Kihara Vavau: Tales of Ancient Samoa by Shigeyuki Kihara

Vavau: Tales of Ancient Samoa by Shigeyuki Kihara

20 October – 22 December 2006

The concept for Vavau: tales of ancient Samoa was grounded in Samoan legend and narrative. However, rather than continuing traditional modes of representation it aimed to employ a more self-conscious and critical approach to the construction of visual representations of the South Pacific and specifically that of its indigenous women. Shigeyuki Kihara’s photographs operate in the context of the ‘dusky maiden’ and ‘velvet lady’ genres which have become indelibly linked to the visual identity of the South Pacific.

Curated by Pennie Hunt.

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2005

Avant-Garde or Death: Estonian artists PinkPunk and Avangarde Avant-Garde or Death: Estonian artists PinkPunk and Avangarde

Avant-Garde or Death: Estonian artists PinkPunk and Avangarde

1 March – 6 May 2005

Powder Room: Hye Rim Lee Powder Room: Hye Rim Lee

Powder Room: Hye Rim Lee

19 May – 8 July 2005

Powder Room was part of Hye Rim Lee’s ongoing series TOKI/Cyborg Project: game, pop and cyber world. It focused on the creative process of computer game design and explored the link between popular culture and new technology’s role in image making and representation. 

This project explored the motivation, driven by mass media and advertising, that propels such a huge number of women to undertake invasive surgical procedures. Lee also questioned the changing perception of Korean women’s bodies, by both men and women, where beauty has become less a vanity than an actual requirement of decorum. The mirror-like screens in the powder room evoke both projection and reflection. 

Julia Morrison: Teaching Aids

19 May – 8 July 2005

Curated by Helen Calder.

ArtconneXions ArtconneXions

ArtconneXions

21 July – 15 September 2005

This project was a series of multi-lateral exchanges between German and South East Asian and Australasian artists working in photomedia. It provided insights into residencies in the three cities, exploring how local and international artists regarded the locations and the connections with their residencies, and also the artist’s own places of origin.

Curated by Peter Shand with Juergen Bergbauer and Michael Schaowanasai.

The Expatriates: Frances Hodgkins and Barrie Bates The Expatriates: Frances Hodgkins and Barrie Bates

The Expatriates: Frances Hodgkins and Barrie Bates

28 September – 16 December 2005

The Expatriates: Frances Hodgkins and Barrie Bates was an exhibition curated by Christina Barton, Senior Lecturer in Art History, Victoria University of Wellington. It took a fresh look at the works of two of New Zealand’s most prominent 20th century artists, Frances Hodgkins and Barrie Bates (now better known as Billy Apple).

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2004

Garden City Garden City

Garden City

31 January – 13 March 2004

Garden City, by Auckland-based artist Lisa Crowley, explored the idea of a sanctuary as a physical space – a private zone, protected from the hostile forces of the outside world.  For Crowley, the notion of a sanctuary had a strange kind of resonance in terms of how we might imagine a global community today. Oppositional terms, such as good and evil, West and East, democracy and terrorism, safe and hostile are catch-phrases used to describe the geo-political territory of the 21st century. The idea of a sanctuary in this context compels us to imagine that which lies beyond our boundaries as threatening and destructive. This exhibition questioned and explored these ideological constructs through moving image and photography, work developed out of Crowley’s recent trip to the Middle East. 

PUBLIC/PRIVATE Tumatanui/Tumataiti: The 2nd Auckland Triennial PUBLIC/PRIVATE Tumatanui/Tumataiti: The 2nd Auckland Triennial

PUBLIC/PRIVATE Tumatanui/Tumataiti: The 2nd Auckland Triennial

20 March – 30 May 2004

Curated by Ngahiraka Mason and Ewen McDonald in association with Auckland Art Gallery.

Walters en abyme Walters en abyme

Walters en abyme

12 June – 31 July 2004

This exhibition of Gordon Walters, better known for his use of the koru motif, examined another structure in his oeuvre that he began in the 1950s and continued until his death. En Abyme looked at work that has a miniature version of itself within itself, operating somewhat like traditional Russian dolls. Curated by Dr Francis Pound.

Friendly Fire: Gus Fisher Gallery Friendly Fire: Gus Fisher Gallery

Friendly Fire: Gus Fisher Gallery

7 August – 18 September 2004

This exhibition was a collection of humorous, compelling and at times horrifying works of art by internationally renowned artists. It focused on the paradoxes and absurdities produced technologically. A key theme of the exhibition was that every technological system contains inside itself the possibility of its failure.

Curated by Leonhard Emmerling from Berlin, the term Friendly Fire was borrowed from military jargon, and refers to troops or allies attacking their own units. The term was chosen because deaths, as a result of friendly fire, have increased even though more technical devices are now available to help distinguish between military and civil targets. 

Polar Projects Polar Projects

Polar Projects

29 September – 12 November 2004

Winner of a recent New Zealand Arts Foundation Laureate award for his work as a sound artist, Phil Dadson presented in this exhibition the results of his 2003 trip to Antarctica in a uniquely sonic vision. Polar Projects, was the result of an intense week of camping with science teams in the Taylor and Garwood Dry Valleys. It offered a vision of a place that looked and sounded like no other on earth.

Through video, sound, performance and installation, Dadson alerted audiences to the extraordinary qualities of sound. In the Antarctic region of comparative silence, Dadson used sound to direct the way he saw and experienced.

Curated by Andrew Clifford. 

Undertow: Susan Norrie Undertow: Susan Norrie

Undertow: Susan Norrie

29 September – 13 November 2004

The major component in Undertow, a huge full-wall projection, showed the tumultuous sea, a forest inferno, looming dust storm, and the world engulfed in a drama of apprehension and confusion. Images of environmental catastrophe brought about by human interventions such as the Melbourne dust storm of 1983.

In another projection, nature fights for its life, quite literally in the image of a bird being drowned in oil – a tragic fated hero in the battle between ecology and industry.

Curated by Juliana Engberg. 

Julian Daspher/John Nixon: The world is your studio Julian Daspher/John Nixon: The world is your studio

Julian Daspher/John Nixon: The world is your studio

20 November 2004 – 12 February 2005

From their first two-person exhibition in London in 1997, Julian Dashper (New Zealand) and John Nixon (Australia) have been interested in the dynamics of the collaborative process. Collaboration and interaction with artists from other countries fits seamlessly with their respective individual practices revealing both parallels and differences in their work.

Julian Dashper/John Nixon: The world is your studio paired an artist from each side of the Tasman, part of an ongoing trans-Tasman collaboration between Dashper and Nixon that is unparalleled in either country. Both artists also maintain an active profile in each other’s country and this show explores parallels between the two cultures that have traditionally imagined themselves to be alone, isolated from the rest of the world. 

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2003

Screen Life: Videos from Australia Screen Life: Videos from Australia

Screen Life: Videos from Australia

31 January – 8 March 2003

This was an important exhibition of Australian video art, documenting the practice since 1970. The programme featured video work ranging from documentation of 1970s performance art, to aboriginal TV from the 1980s, to a selection of artists’ film and video projects to excerpts from installation and performance works.

The 11 artists featured in the exhibition used the medium to display a range of different techniques such as sound art, performance, painting, sculpture and photography. Curators Stuart Koop and Max Delany described the importance of video art as “to collect and distribute information via a uniform interface”.

Dead Ringer: The Duplicitous Image Dead Ringer: The Duplicitous Image

Dead Ringer: The Duplicitous Image

22 March – 3 May 2003

This exhibition brought together work of photographic artists Ann Shelton, Joyce Campbell and Darren Glass. It considered the duplicitous nature of photographic images in confounding the viewer’s perception of the ‘real’, combining aesthetic seduction with forensic unease.

Curated by Robin Stoney. 

Vuletic and his Circle Vuletic and his Circle

Vuletic and his Circle

10 May – 28 June 2003

This exhibition visited the influence of Auckland art gallery owner, Petar Vuletic upon the development of New Zealand’s contemporary art scene in the 1970s. Called Vuletic and his Circle, the exhibition concentrated on the critical years between 1972 and 1976 during which Vuletic ran the Petar/James Gallery. At the time, New Zealand painting was dominated by landscape painting and regionalist themes. Vuletic’s internationalist outlook and his focus on modernist abstraction flew in the face of these prevailing local concerns.

Curated by Ed Hanfling and Alan Wright.

Paula Modersohn-Becker and the Worpswede Artists: Drawings and Prints 1895-1906 Paula Modersohn-Becker and the Worpswede Artists: Drawings and Prints 1895-1906

Paula Modersohn-Becker and the Worpswede Artists: Drawings and Prints 1895-1906

5 July – 30 August 2003

Toured by the German Institute for Foreign Relations, with the support of the Goethe Institut.

Extra Lives

6 September – 18 October 2003

Extra Lives featured a selection of work by leading national and international artists who utilised the structures and rules of video games to challenge the impact of those games on both contemporary culture and contemporary art. Works in the exhibition considered the way in which art had appropriated the aesthetics and tools of game developers to retain its audience. The exhibition included a selection of work from the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery exhibition, Arcadia: the other life of video games.

Elsewhere Elsewhere

Elsewhere

24 October – 17 December 2003

Elsewhere, recently seen at the Djanogly Gallery in England, was the outcome of the first ever Universitas 21 cultural residency undertaken by Caroline Rothwell at Nottingham University in England. Elsewhere was based broadly on the idea of Arcadia and the Weed. It sampled specimens of the natural history ‘exchange’ between New Zealand and England. Imagery was appropriated from sources ranging from Joseph Banks botanical specimens and etchings; drawings of weeds in the artist’s garden; FW Hilgendorf’s Weeds of New Zealand (published in 1926) where, for example, the silver fern – a national icon – is labelled a weed.

Slow Light Slow Light

Slow Light

24 October – 17 December 2003

Curated by Wystan Curnow. 

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2002

Stereoscope: William Kentridge Stereoscope: William Kentridge

Stereoscope: William Kentridge

23 January – 16 March 2002

William Kentridge (b.1955 Johannesburg) has achieved wide acclaim for his animated films that focus on personal insights surrounding the complex and often violent history of South Africa, endowing it with a universal relevance.

William Kentridge’s distinctive process involved making animated films of charcoal drawings. Each drawing was altered many times in a sequence drawn, filmed on 35mm camera, erased, redrawn, filmed again and so on in a constant process of walking between the drawing and the camera. Each successive image retained the trace of the one that preceded it, “so each sheet of paper has built into it the history of that particular sequence”, said Kentridge, giving it not only a sense of its process but also of the passage of time.

Stereoscope upheld the interface between the single and the split image, where objects of machinery such as a telephone or calculator were drawn as a double image on the screen with each splitting off into a new entity. Kentridge is interested in the relationship between the two different objects or selves to each other.

Curated by Elizabeth Rankin. 

Memos for the New Millenium

23 March – 11 May 2002

Curated by Peter Shand.

Anni Albers: Works on Paper from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Connecticut Anni Albers: Works on Paper from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Connecticut

Anni Albers: Works on Paper from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Connecticut

18 May – 6 July 2002

Anni Albers (1899-1994), Bauhaus trained textile designer, draughtsman and printmaker, and her husband Josef Albers left Germany after the closure of Bauhaus in 1933, to teach and work at the experimental liberal arts school Black Mountain College in North Carolina where she remained until 1949.

Albers had learned to create designs on paper and translate these to the loom, but she soon began to design directly on the loom, a development which coincided with her immigration to America.  Trips to Mexico and Latin America from 1935, particularly the arts of the Mayans and the Incas, and ancient Peruvian weaving, provided further stimulus.   In keeping with her modernist principles, Albers’ one-off compositions, “pictorial weavings” were intended as the equivalent of abstract paintings.

From 1963, working at the Tamarind Lithography Workshop in California, Anni Albers began to make prints, noted for their achievement of textural and spatial complexity from a deliberately limited vocabulary of forms. In her words, “We learn courage from art work…We learn to dare to make a choice, to be independent”. 

Along Bauhaus Lines

18 May – 6 July 2002

Curated by Douglas Lloyd-Jenkins. It featured Frank Carpay, Tibor Donner, Clifton Firth, Colin McCahon, Milan Mrkusich, Patricia Perrin, Ilse Von Randow and Theo Schoon. 

Botanica

13 July – 31 August 2002

An Adam Art Gallery exhibition curated by Zara Stanhope, Botanica drew extensively from New Zealand and Australasian public and private collections of historical and contemporary scientific botanical documents and visual arts works. It had been redeveloped for Auckland, and includes new examples from artists in the Auckland region.

The exhibition included specimens collected by Joseph Banks and Daniel Solander, scientists on James Cook’s Endeavour, along with reproductions of plants depicted by the ship’s artist Sydney Parkinson. It also featured early colonial documentation of New Zealand plants, indicating the level of interest in the newly seen species, as well as more contemporary responses to botanical subject matter, including gigantic swaying sunflower sculptures, glass sculptures and jewellery.

Gavin Hipkins: The Colony Gavin Hipkins: The Colony

Gavin Hipkins: The Colony

7 September – 18 October 2002

Gavin Hipkins called The Colony “science fiction”. He shot 100 photos of hemispherical polystyrene blobs against makeshift paper backdrops. The photos were stacked at random like a bar graph or a high-rise city skyline. The work was huge about 10 metres wide and 3.5 metres high. The models were geometrical yet organic, resembling at once alien pods, igloos, pup tents, breast and the curvaceous hills and mud pools of his native land. The work could imply a social experiment or a microscopic experiment; an imperialist force, a commune of hippie ‘drop-outs’ with their geodesic domes, a high-tech off-world colony. The dazzling work left you with a sense of monstrous viral replication. Science fiction crossed over into horror.  

Rose Nolan and Marco Fusinato Rose Nolan and Marco Fusinato

Rose Nolan and Marco Fusinato

25 October – 14 December 2002

Rose Nolan and Marco Fusinato, both Melbourne-based artists, share a witty and DIY affection for the reformatted poetics of revolutionary modernism.  Nolan’s large-scale painted banners are like communist relics of another age. Dramatic, bold, iconic – and yet they cannot be read that simply. A large red and white painted hessian banner and a painted wall text bore evidence of the artist’s fascination for the Russian Constructivists and Futurists of the early 20th century.  Here, the quest for utopia was replaced by reflection and wit.

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2001

Bright Paradise: The 1st Auckland Triennial Bright Paradise: The 1st Auckland Triennial

Bright Paradise: The 1st Auckland Triennial

3 March – 3 June 2001

Diversions

26 May – 6 July 2001

White Absence: Mladen Stilinovic White Absence: Mladen Stilinovic

White Absence: Mladen Stilinovic

14 July – 24 August 2001

Curated by Wystan Curnow. 

Displacement and Creativity: Refugees and the Arts in New Zealand Displacement and Creativity: Refugees and the Arts in New Zealand

Displacement and Creativity: Refugees and the Arts in New Zealand

4 September – 14 October 2001

Curated by Len Bell. 

Colonial View: Watercolours from the Fletcher Art Trust Collection Colonial View: Watercolours from the Fletcher Art Trust Collection

Colonial View: Watercolours from the Fletcher Art Trust Collection

23 October – 15 December 2001

This was an exhibition of 19th-century watercolours on view to the public for the first time. The works were from The Fletcher Trust Art Collection, one of the largest and most complete collections of New Zealand art held outside a public gallery. The exhibition included works by John Gully, Charles Heaphy, John Gilfillan, Gustavus Ferdinand von Tempsky and Alfred Sharpe.

Curated by Peter Shaw. 

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