Current Exhibitions

Gus Fisher Gallery

Denys Watkins: Dynamo Hum Denys Watkins: Dynamo Hum

Denys Watkins: Dynamo Hum

17 November - 15 December

The exhibition features a selection of key paintings by Denys Watkins - one of New Zealand’s outstanding visual artists. The exhibition is the first travelling survey of recent works by Watkins, a practicising artist for nearly fifty years, whose work is featured in public and private collections around the country.

Accompanying the exhibition programme will be a new hardcover monograph covering Denys Watkins’s practice over the same time period, featuring writing from leading New Zealand art writers, Allan Smith, Anna Miles, Francis McWhannell, photographs by Sam Hartnett, designed by Jonty Valentine, and printed by Soar. The book will be available for sale at the gallery.

Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand 1930-1980 Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand 1930-1980

Strangers Arrive: Emigrés and the Arts in New Zealand 1930-1980

24 November - 15 December

None of us had the faintest idea where we were going [but] during 1938–39 . . . the town [Christchurch] was made strangely interesting for anyone like myself, [with the] scattered arrival of ‘the refugees’. All at once there were people among us who were actually from Vienna, or Chemnitz, or Berlin . . . who knew the work of Schoenberg and Gropius.

– Antony Alpers, 1985

 

From the 1930s through to the 1950s, refugees from Nazism and displaced people after World War II arrived in New Zealand from Europe. Among them were artists and writers, photographers and architects whose European modernism radically reshaped the arts in this country. Strangers Arrive exhibits works by talented émigrés, who introduced new practices and ideas to this country. They include photographers Frank Hofmann and Richard Sharell, artists Theo Schoon, Frederick Ost, Kees Hos and Tom Kreisler, and architects Imi Porsolt and Henry Kulka. The exhibition also features works by New Zealand-born expatriates (émigrés in reverse) James Boswell and Douglas MacDiarmid, whose art was crucially informed by their experiences of Continental European people and pictures.

Curated by Associate Professor Len Bell.